rising


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rise (up) in the world

To elevate or improve one's social, political, and/or financial position in life; to become more successful than one was before. You're only going to truly rise up in the world if you make a point of rubbing elbows with those of a higher social standing. It's unsurprising how quickly Sarah has risen in the world when you consider that her tenacity and determination are only matched by her intelligence and talent. The Robinsons really rose up in the world after they won the lottery.
See also: rise, world

a rising tide lifts all boats

economics A strong economy benefits businesses and individuals at all levels. The phrase was popularized by US President John F. Kennedy. Thanks to the economy doing so well lately, our business has been booming. I guess it's really true what they say, that a rising tide lifts all boats.
See also: all, boat, lift, rising, tide

rise to (something)

To increase one's effort in response to a challenging situation. If you're going to lead this team, you've got to rise to the challenge and start motivating them. It was a tough act to follow, but the band rose to the occasion and played the best set of their career.
See also: rise

rise above

1. To achieve superiority over someone or something. The star pupil rose far above the rest of the students in his class. There are points where the film rises above simple cinema and transcends into art.
2. To act more maturely than someone; to disregard or refuse to engage in petty or unimportant actions or behavior. Listen, I know they get on your nerves, but you've got to rise above such belittling comments. I'm still trying to rise above my tendency to get angry at other drivers.
See also: above, rise

rise to the bait

To respond to someone's provoking actions or words in the way that they intended. Likened to a fish attempting to eat the bait on a hook. That's just what he wants you to do. Don't rise to the bait. The undercover officer changed the conversation to the recent burglary, hoping the thief would rise to the bait and confess. Promise John some free drinks, and he'll rise to the bait every time.
See also: bait, rise

rise to the occasion

To increase one's effort in response to a challenging situation. If you're going to lead this team, you've got to rise to the occasion and start motivating them. It was a tough act to follow, but the band rose to the occasion and played the best set of their career.
See also: occasion, rise

rise like a rocket (and fall like a stick)

To experience a meteoric rise in success (and then have one's fortunes reversed just as suddenly and dramatically). The phrase can be used to describe someone or something who has only experienced a period of success so far, not necessarily one followed by a downturn. Everyone has their eyes on the young actress who has been rising like a rocket in the film industry. The company rose like a rocket by trading sub-prime mortgages, and then fell like a stick when the housing bubble burst.
See also: fall, like, rise, rocket

rise with the lark

To wake and get out of bed at sunrise. I've always loved camping: rising with the lark, cooking breakfast over an open fire, exploring the great outdoor—it's all wonderful!
See also: lark, rise

rise with the sun

To wake and get out of bed at sunrise. I've always loved camping: rising with the sun, cooking breakfast over an open fire, exploring the great outdoor—it's all wonderful!
See also: rise, sun

(one's) star is rising

One's social, political, or financial success is increasing very quickly; one is on the way to great fame or fortune. It's clear the actress's star is rising, as she is now confirmed for three more major blockbuster films over the next few years.
See also: rising, star

rise from the ashes

To emerge renewed, revitalized, or reborn as something different following some total destruction or ruin. A reference to the mythical phoenix, a bird that in many stories bursts into flames upon its death, being born again among the ashes. Over the next few years, a new tower rose from the ashes of the heinous attack, standing as a monument of the country's strength and pride. The company quietly faded into obscurity following its bankruptcy in the late 90s, but now that it has been purchased by the billionaire CEO, it has begun rising from the ashes like the phoenix.
See also: ash, rise

rise through the ranks

To reach a prominent position after serving in subordinate ones. The employees trust Stu as their manager because they know that he rose through the ranks from the same entry-level position that they have now. The only way you'll rise through the ranks here is by putting in enough time and hard work.
See also: rank, rise, through

rise to the challenge

To discover or utilize the strength, determination, or skill necessary to accomplish some difficult task successfully. I know that you're nervous about taking on such a senior role in the company, but I'm totally confident that you'll rise to the challenge. The odds were against them, but the home team rose to the challenge and managed to win the championship.
See also: challenge, rise

rise up

1. To move vertically, especially at a smooth, consistent pace. It was amazing watching all those hot air balloons rising up at the same time. He clutched the seat and shut his eyes the moment he felt the plane rise up into the air.
2. To move into a standing position after sitting, kneeling, or lying down. After the prayer, we all rose up from our knees to sing a hymn. He tried to rise up out of bed, but he was so weak that he collapsed back onto his pillow.
3. To increase in amount or intensity, especially at a smooth, consistent pace. The chorus rose up in a majestic surge of music, leaving the listeners shaken with emotion and As the rains continued to pour down, the swimming pool began rising up until it overflowed and flooded the back yard.
See also: rise, up

rise up against (someone or something)

To rebel or revolt against someone or something; to begin resisting or defying someone or something. After their pay was cut a third time, the employees rose up against the management and began an organized strike. Citizens around the country have begun rising up in response to the military's seizure of power.
See also: rise, up

rise above something

 
1. Lit. to move up above something. The huge sun rose above the horizon and spread its red glow across the sea.
2. Fig. [for one] to ignore petty matters and do what one is meant to do in spite of them. He was able to rise above the squabbling and bring some sense to the proceedings. Jane was never able to rise above her petty dislikes.
See also: above, rise

rise from the ashes

Fig. [for a structure] to be rebuilt after destruction. The entire west section of the city was destroyed and a group of new buildings rose from the ashes in only a few months. Will the city rise again from the ashes? No one knows.
See also: ash, rise

rise to the bait

Fig. to respond to an allurement; to fall for an enticement or fall into a trap. (Alludes to a fish coming up from deep water to seize bait.) You can get him here easily. Tell him that there will be lots of food and he will rise to the bait. He rose to the bait and did just as he was expected to do.
See also: bait, rise

rise to the challenge

Fig. to accept a challenge. (Usually in reference to success with the challenge.) You can depend on Kelly to rise to the challenge. We were not able to rise to the challenge and we lost the contract.
See also: challenge, rise

rise to the occasion

Fig. to meet the challenge of an event; to try extra hard to do a task. John was able to rise to the occasion and make the conference a success. It was a big challenge, but he rose to the occasion.
See also: occasion, rise

rise up

 
1. to come up; to ascend. The water is rising up fast. You had better get to higher ground. As the water rose up, it covered the fields and streets.
2. to get up from lying down. The deer rose up and darted off into the woods. I rose up and brushed my clothing.
See also: rise, up

rise from the ashes

Emerge as new from something that has been destroyed, as in A few months after the earthquake large sections of the city had risen from the ashes. This expression alludes to the legendary phoenix, a bird that supposedly rose from the ashes of its funeral pyre with renewed youth.
See also: ash, rise

rise through the ranks

Also, rise from the ranks; come up through the ranks. Work one's way to the top, as in He's risen through the ranks, starting as a copyboy and ending up as senior editor. Originally this term was used for an officer who had worked his way up from the rank of private, a rare feat. It was being applied to nonmilitary advances by the mid-1800s. Also see come up, def. 4.
See also: rank, rise, through

rise to the bait

Be tempted by or react to an enticement, as in We told him there'd be lots of single young women at the party, and he rose to the bait . Likening a fish rising to bait to human behavior dates from the late 1500s.
See also: bait, rise

rise to the occasion

Show unexpected skill in dealing with a difficulty that arises, as in The leading man broke his leg in the first act but his understudy rose to the occasion and was rewarded with excellent reviews . [Mid-1800s]
See also: occasion, rise

rise to the bait

or

take the bait

If you rise to the bait or take the bait, you react to something that someone has said or done in exactly the way that they wanted you to react. Adrina tried to provoke me, but I refused to rise to the bait. Julia told him that she had fallen off a horse as a child and lost her confidence. Hewitt immediately took the bait, offering to teach her to ride. Note: In fly-fishing, the fish rise to the surface of the water to take the bait, and so they get caught.
See also: bait, rise

rise through (or from) the ranks

1 (of a private or a non-commissioned officer) receive a commission. 2 advance from a lowly position in an organization by your own efforts.
See also: rank, rise, through

rise from the ashes

be renewed after destruction.
In classical mythology, the phoenix was a unique bird resembling an eagle that lived for five or six centuries in the Arabian desert. After this time it burned itself on a funeral pyre ignited by the sun and fanned by its own wings and was then born again from the ashes with renewed youth to live through another cycle of life. The simile like a phoenix from the ashes is used of someone or something that has made a fresh start after apparently experiencing total destruction.
See also: ash, rise

rise to the bait

react to a provocation or temptation exactly as intended.
The image here is of a fish coming to the surface to take a bait or fly.
1966 Listener I should perhaps apologise for having risen to the bait of Mr Wilkinson's provocative letter.
See also: bait, rise

rise to the occasion

perform better than usual in response to a special situation or event.
See also: occasion, rise

rise with the sun (or lark)

get up early in the morning.
See also: rise, sun

someone's star is rising

someone is becoming ever more successful or popular.
See also: rising, star

ˌrise from the ˈashes

become successful or powerful again after defeat or destruction: Can a new party rise from the ashes of the old one?This idiom refers to the story of the phoenix, a mythological bird which burns to death and then rises from the ashes to be born again.
See also: ash, rise

rise to the ˈbait

act or react to something in exactly the way another person wants you to: I knew he was trying to get me angry, but I didn’t rise to the bait.
A fisherman uses bait to attract fish to his hook.
See also: bait, rise

a rising ˌtide lifts all ˈboats

(saying, especially American English) (politics) used to say that everybody benefits when a country’s economy grows and improves: Anger over inequality is absent during periods of expansion, because a rising tide lifts all boats.This expression is often associated with US President John F. Kennedy.
See also: all, boat, lift, rising, tide

rise above

v.
1. To move upward above something: The balloon rose above the trees.
2. To extend upward; be prominent over something: The tower rises above the hill.
3. To be superior to something or someone: Her performance rises above that of her peers.
4. To adopt a better attitude in order to avoid being burdened or concerned with something: He rose above the silly arguing among his classmates and thought of his own ideas.
See also: above, rise

rise up

v.
1. To assume a standing position after lying, sitting, or kneeling: The kindergartners rose up after naptime and resumed their activities.
2. To travel upward: The hot air balloon is rising up above the clouds.
3. To rise into view, especially from below the horizon: The campers were eating breakfast when they saw the sun rise up over the mountains.
4. To increase in pitch or volume; swell: In the final chorus, the altos rose up above the other voices.
5. To surge from an inner source; well up: Even though the situation seemed desperate, I felt hope rise up within me.
6. To stage a resistance or revolt; rebel: The migrant workers rose up against the unfair wages.
See also: rise, up

rise to the occasion

To find the ability to deal with an unexpected challenge.
See also: occasion, rise
References in periodicals archive ?
In the circumstances, the risks to the economy appeared to be strongly tilted toward rising inflation whose emergence would in turn threaten the sustainability of the expansion.
Investment in drilling also rose in 1993, as incentives from rising prices for natural gas apparently offset the disincentives associated with falling oil prices.
In contrast to 1987, when the indexes were boosted by a rebound in energy prices and rising prices for imports, the inflationary pressures this past year were augmented by larger increases in labor costs in the U.
Rising is able to design the best RFIC chip sets for the customers in China.
Using the Encounter and Virtuoso platforms, Rising performed the design work for its SCDMA/GSM transceiver, from front-end circuit design and system simulation to final layout design and test.
Welcomed by both investors and members of the financial press, the Eastern Point Advisors Rising Dividend Growth Fund was highlighted in a three-page article in Forbes Magazine's Nov.
Fastclick qualified as a Rising Star after showing revenue growth of 540 percent over the three-year period.
Sales in the deregulated Spanish market performed especially well, rising by 21% to 14,500 GWh.
One concern we have is for low- and moderate-income families who are hurt the most by rising interest rates -- we need to preserve programs that can help families at all income levels to get into homes," he said.
Touting itself as the first local IC design house to commercialize a 10Gbps optical transmission IC with its proprietary intellectual property (IP), Rising is targeting its first series of ICs at various high-end applications, such as 10Gbps optical Ethernet links, optical data links, high-definition television (HDTV) optical fiber links, synchronous optical network (SONET) OC-192, synchronous digital hierarchy (SDH) STM-64 and wavelength division multiplexing (WDM).
A rising tide of negative ratings momentum in the past few years has resulted in the number of rising stars recorded globally being outstripped by the number of fallen angels in each year since 1999, said a report released today by Standard & Poor's Ratings Services said.
ProFunds today announced that its Rising Rates Opportunity funds reached $303 million in invested assets - an increase of $285 million since Jan.
investors (57%) believe interest rates will rise in the next two years, nearly two-thirds (65%) are unaware that rising rates generally have a negative impact on the value of bond investments.