riot

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run amok

1. To behave or run around in a wild, unruly, out-of-control manner; to be crazy or chaotic. We tried to have some organized games for the kids, but as soon as they all got here they started running amok. The villagers were cleaning up debris for days after the bulls ran amok through the streets.
2. To become bad or go awry; to get out of control; to go haywire. This whole operation has run amok. I don't know how we can be expected to finish under the deadline in these conditions.
3. dated To rush around in a violent, murderous frenzy. This is the phrase's original meaning, taken from Malay. "Amok" also has an older alternative spelling, "amuck." Members of the warrior clan were known to run amok on the battlefield in a bloodthirsty frenzy.
See also: amok, run

run riot

To act in a chaotic manner. As soon as the alarm went off, everyone in the room ran riot.
See also: riot, run

read (one) the riot act

To scold, reprimand, or reprove someone severely for an error or mistake. I was read the riot act by my boss last week for messing up the accounting software. I know Mary messed up, but there was no need to read her the riot act for it.
See also: act, read, riot

read someone the riot act

Fig. to give someone a severe scolding. The manager read me the riot act for coming in late. The teacher read the students the riot act for their failure to do their assignments.
See also: act, read, riot

riot of color

Cliché a selection of many bright colors. The landscape was a riot of color each autumn.
See also: color, of, riot

run amok

 and run amuck
to go awry; to go bad; to turn bad; to go into a frenzy. (From a Malay word meaning to run wild in a violent frenzy.) Our plan ran amok. He ran amuck early in the school year and never quite got back on the track.
See also: amok, run

run riot

 and run wild
Fig. to get out of control. The dandelions have run riot in our lawn. The children ran wild at the birthday party and had to be taken home.
See also: riot, run

read the riot act

Warn or reprimand forcefully or severely, as in When he was caught throwing stones at the windows, the principal read him the riot act . This term alludes to an actual British law, the Riot Act of 1714, which required reading a proclamation so as to disperse a crowd; those who did not obey within an hour were guilty of a felony. [First half of 1800s]
See also: act, read, riot

run amok

Also, run riot or wild . Behave in a frenzied, out-of-control, or unrestrained manner. For example, I was afraid that if I left the toddler alone she would run amok and have a hard time calming down , or The weeds are running riot in the lawn, or The children were running wild in the playground. Amok comes from a Malay word for "frenzied" and was adopted into English, and at first spelled amuck, in the second half of the 1600s. Run riot dates from the early 1500s and derives from an earlier sense, that is, a hound's following an animal scent. Run wild alludes to an animal reverting to its natural, uncultivated state; its figurative use dates from the late 1700s.
See also: amok, run

read (someone) the riot act

If someone in authority reads the riot act or reads someone the riot act, they angrily tell someone off for having done something stupid or wrong. I'm glad you read the riot act to Billy. He's still a kid, you know. He still needs to be told what to do. At the weekly cabinet meeting the following day, an enraged Mr Schroder read his ministers the riot act. Note: The Riot Act was a law passed in Britain in 1715. It made it an offence for a group of twelve or more people to refuse to break up and leave if someone in authority read them the relevant section of the Act.
See also: act, read, riot

run riot

COMMON
1. If someone runs riot, they behave badly, sometimes violently, and in a way that is not controlled. My older sister Mandy had run riot so my parents were far stricter with me. In these neighbourhoods, gangs are allowed to run riot, terrorising the innocent while the police stay safely away.
2. If something such as imagination or speculation runs riot, it expresses itself or spreads in an uncontrolled way. My imagination ran riot, visualising late nights and weekend parties. We have no proof and when there is no proof, rumour runs riot. Note: In hunting, if the hounds run riot, they follow the scents of other animals rather than the one they are supposed to be chasing.
See also: riot, run

run amok

behave uncontrollably and disruptively.
Amok , formerly also spelt amuck , comes from the Malay word amuk , meaning ‘in a homicidal frenzy’, in which sense it was first introduced into English in the early 16th century.
1990 New York Review of Books Hersh's article is sensationalism run amok. It does no credit to him or to The New York Times Magazine .
See also: amok, run

read the riot act

give someone a strong warning that they must improve their behaviour.
The Riot Act was passed by the British government in 1715 in the wake of the Jacobite rebellion of that year and was designed to prevent civil disorder. The Act made it a felony for a group of twelve or more people to refuse to disperse after being ordered to do so and having being read a certain part of the Act by a person in authority. It was not repealed until 1967 .
See also: act, read, riot

run riot

1 behave in a violent and unrestrained way. 2 (of a mental faculty or emotion) function or be expressed without restraint. 3 proliferate or spread uncontrollably.
See also: riot, run

run aˈmok

behave in a wild or uncontrolled way: The crowd ran amok through the city streets when they heard their leaders had been killed. Amok comes from the Malay word for ‘attack fiercely’.
See also: amok, run

read (somebody) the ˈRiot Act

(British English) tell somebody forcefully and angrily that you will punish them if they do not stop behaving badly; be angry with somebody who has behaved badly: The headmaster came in and read the Riot Act. He said he would keep us in after school if there was one more complaint about us.In 1715 the Riot Act was passed in Parliament. Groups of more than twelve people were not allowed to meet in public. If they did, an official came to read them the Riot Act, which ordered them to stop the meeting.
See also: act, read, riot

run ˈriot

get out of control: They allow their children to run riot — it’s not surprising that the house is always in such a mess.His imagination ran riot as he thought what he would do if he won the money.
See also: riot, run

riot

(ˈrɑɪət)
n. someone or something entertaining or funny. Tom was a riot last night.

run amok

(ˈrən əˈmək)
in. to go awry. (From a Malay word meaning to run wild in a violent frenzy.) Our plan ran amok.
See also: amok, run

read the riot act

To warn or reprimand energetically or forcefully: The teacher read the riot act to the rowdy class.
See also: act, read, riot

read the riot act

Criticize harshly. A 1725 British Act of Parliament provided that a magistrate could tell any gathering of a dozen or more people who were creating a civil disturbance to disperse by reading an official statement to that effect. Failure to heed the warning led to arrest (the law remained in effect until 1973). Used popularly, the phrase became the equivalent of “getting a good chewing out,” even if only one person was “read the riot act.”
See also: act, read, riot
References in periodicals archive ?
The report recommended that police authorities should "immediately" review their emergency plans to ensure they properly cover public disorder on the scale of the August riots.
Using tear gas, clubs, and pistol shots fired into the air, police Saturday broke up two riots at the $1,000,000 Sojourner Truth Housing project," an unnamed reporter began, then turned immediately to whites injured in the riot:
The Buffalo riot fits into the general pattern found by the writers of the Kerner Commission Report, a national advisory committee report which analyzed various riots that occurred across the United States in 1967.
Responding to the publication of an independent review of the Riot Damages Act, John Biggs AM, Chair of the London Assembly s Budget and Performance Committee said:
However, he said also said that he welcomed the proposal to set up a riot claims bureau staffed by insurance experts to evaluate claims more effectively.
And it has been suggested," Wild Bill adds, "that if George Zimmerman is convicted, that Whites should riot.
If original sin caused riots in Handsworth, why were there no riots in the leafy suburbs of Solihull or Sutton Coldfield at the same time?
But shopkeepers in some hardhit areas have now been told local unrest didn't qualify as a fullblown riot so they can't claim.
The police authority had appealed to the Government to meet the bills for the street riots - estimated at pounds 2.
The Riots Communities and Victims Panel was set up by Nick Clegg, the Deputy Prime Minister, to investigate the causes of August's riots.
The global riot control systems market size is estimated to be $3,784.
This talk about 600 communal riots is totally wrong.
PEOPLE and businesses will be put at risk of financial hardship if proposed reforms to the way claims for riot damage are paid out go ahead, insurers are warning.
There were riots in 2002 and hence questions were raised and therefore criticisms were bound to come, and I was a journalist hence I did take it up strongly.
during the tumultuous 1960s and 1970s, a string of riots started by whites occurred in the years after World War I ended in 1918.