riot

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read someone the riot act

Fig. to give someone a severe scolding. The manager read me the riot act for coming in late. The teacher read the students the riot act for their failure to do their assignments.
See also: act, read, riot

riot of color

Cliché a selection of many bright colors. The landscape was a riot of color each autumn.
See also: color, of, riot

run amok

 and run amuck
to go awry; to go bad; to turn bad; to go into a frenzy. (From a Malay word meaning to run wild in a violent frenzy.) Our plan ran amok. He ran amuck early in the school year and never quite got back on the track.
See also: amok, run

run riot

 and run wild
Fig. to get out of control. The dandelions have run riot in our lawn. The children ran wild at the birthday party and had to be taken home.
See also: riot, run

read somebody the riot act

also read the riot act to somebody
to strongly warn someone to stop behaving badly Alice read Randi the riot act, telling her, “If you don't like it here, you can just go back where you came from.” The secretary of state said she plans to read the riot act to the country's leaders during meetings next week.
Related vocabulary: lay down the law
Etymology: based on the Riot Act (an English law of 1715 that provided a way to deal with a crowd of people who were causing trouble)
See also: act, read, riot

run amok

to act in a wild or dangerous manner There were 50 little kids running amok at the snack bar.
See also: amok, run

read (somebody) the riot act

to speak angrily to someone about something they have done and warn them that they will be punished if they do it again
Usage notes: The riot act was a law made in 1715 which said how to deal with groups of twelve or more people who were causing trouble.
He'd put up with a lot of bad behaviour from his son and thought it was time to read him the riot act.
See also: act, read, riot

run riot

 
1. if people run riot, they behave in a way that is not controlled, running in all directions or being noisy or violent I dread them coming round because they let their kids run riot.
2. if your imagination runs riot, you have a lot of strange, exciting, or surprising thoughts My imagination was running riot, thinking of all the ways that I could spend the money.
See read the riot act
See also: riot, run

read the riot act

Warn or reprimand forcefully or severely, as in When he was caught throwing stones at the windows, the principal read him the riot act . This term alludes to an actual British law, the Riot Act of 1714, which required reading a proclamation so as to disperse a crowd; those who did not obey within an hour were guilty of a felony. [First half of 1800s]
See also: act, read, riot

run amok

Also, run riot or wild . Behave in a frenzied, out-of-control, or unrestrained manner. For example, I was afraid that if I left the toddler alone she would run amok and have a hard time calming down , or The weeds are running riot in the lawn, or The children were running wild in the playground. Amok comes from a Malay word for "frenzied" and was adopted into English, and at first spelled amuck, in the second half of the 1600s. Run riot dates from the early 1500s and derives from an earlier sense, that is, a hound's following an animal scent. Run wild alludes to an animal reverting to its natural, uncultivated state; its figurative use dates from the late 1700s.
See also: amok, run

riot

(ˈrɑɪət)
n. someone or something entertaining or funny. Tom was a riot last night.

run amok

(ˈrən əˈmək)
in. to go awry. (From a Malay word meaning to run wild in a violent frenzy.) Our plan ran amok.
See also: amok, run

read the riot act

To warn or reprimand energetically or forcefully: The teacher read the riot act to the rowdy class.
See also: act, read, riot

read the riot act

Criticize harshly. A 1725 British Act of Parliament provided that a magistrate could tell any gathering of a dozen or more people who were creating a civil disturbance to disperse by reading an official statement to that effect. Failure to heed the warning led to arrest (the law remained in effect until 1973). Used popularly, the phrase became the equivalent of “getting a good chewing out,” even if only one person was “read the riot act.”
See also: act, read, riot
References in periodicals archive ?
44) A similar argument can be made for race riots; that is, as police operations and policies break down, opportunities for rioting are enhanced.
Witherspoon's strategy is quoted at length for urging any action that would lead to calming the threat of further rioting even by having his police force "[take] insults to keep trouble from breaking out.
More than 250 people have been detained and about 900 vehicles have been torched since the rioting broke out on Oct.
Deadly prison rioting struck the South American continent again within days of the incident in Lurigancho as eight died in a riot in Cordoba, Argentina, Feb.
The BJP's state party leader called the rioting "a natural statement of Hindu anger.
Mary Whitehouse contacted the BBC at the time of Toxteth and begged them to consider the effects of their coverage on the spread of the rioting and they did later set up an inquiry, at a cost of pounds 500 and lasting less than a week, which concluded that the spread of the riots had nothing to do with television and everything to do with the way people were telephoning one another with news of the riots from pub to pub.
If we all knew to expect rioting and the like, why didn't the Seattle government?
Instead, the author presents a story of political influences and policy decisions that directly impacted the incident and the rioting in the aftermath of the acquittal verdicts of the involved police officers.
3 Kyodo An Indonesian government-appointed team investigating rioting in the capital in May said Tuesday it had confirmed 66 cases of rape.
As in New York, the white business community inadvertently radicalized the city's blacks by funding violent extremists, in a misguided effort to prevent more rioting.
Large, crowded institutions are ripe for rioting, and this includes most American prisons today.
Himes specifically counterposes this idea of a planned incident by a martyr to what he sees as more random, spontaneous rioting, which he condemns as ineffectual and based in self-interest, as opposed to race betterment.
The outcome of this suit and the outcome of several upcoming related cases will go a long way in creating an atmosphere of healing in the wake of King's beating at the hands of four white police officers and the rioting that followed the officers' acquittal.