ring (someone's) bell

(redirected from ring their bells)

ring (someone's) bell

1. To strike someone with a violent blow to the head, especially as might stun or concuss. I would have rung that guy's bell if I knew he had been trash-talking you. Sarah's likely to ring your bell if you keep harassing her like that.
2. To be enjoyable, preferable, or satisfactory to someone; to be or provide something that someone wants. A: "How's that new book you're reading?" B: "Eh, it isn't really ringing my bell, to be honest." I'd rather go see the action movie, if that's all right. Dramas just don't ring my bell.
3. To sexually attract or arouse someone; to bring someone sexual gratification or satisfaction. That redhead from across the bar has been ringing my bell all night. He looks mighty fine, all right. I'd like to take him home and ring his bell!
See also: bell, ring
References in periodicals archive ?
The TRC encouraged churches to ring their bells at noon to "honour residential school survivors, recognize the formal close of the TRC" and to encourage all Canadians to "commit to working towards a reconciled future for all of Canada.
In front of them is a music score bearing all the notes, and they must watch and ring their bells at the right time.
Some 27 churches across Coventry and Warwickshire have pledged to ring their bells after a two-minute silence at 11am on November 11.
Then each tall ship and the fire truck will ring their bells five times as well for each wreath.
Using cloth, Dixie and Mary stitched together a long piece of sheet music, with colors corresponding to the two or three notes on which the kids would ring their bells when Dixie pointed to the square.
EX-SERVICEMEN and women of the Royal British Legion are asking churches to ring their bells to mark the end of the two minutes silence traditionally held at 11am on November 11.
Rosamond churches in conjunction with American Legion Post 490 will ring their bells at 8:45 a.
Twenty-five pairs of eyes burrowed into every square of that cloth sheet music, looking for the color that corresponded with the two or three notes on which they would ring their bells when the choir director pointed to the square.