right of way


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right of way

1. The right of one person or vehicle to travel over another's property, as in The new owner doesn't like it, but hikers have had the right of way through these woods for decades . [Mid-1700s]
2. The right to precede another person or vehicle, as in Sailboats always have the right of way over motorboats, and swimmers do over any kind of boat . [Early 1900s]
See also: of, right, way
References in periodicals archive ?
Otherwise, small signs cost $125 plus a $100 deposit and can be placed out of right of ways up to 30 days at a time for a total of 60 days a year, said Jackie Murdoch, assistant community services manager.
The spokeswoman added: "The grant of planning permission does not entitle a developer to obstruct a public right of way.
Bruce Wallace, right of ways manager for Carmarthenshire, said any such application would face tough examination.
Court of Federal Claims devoted considerable dicta in the Final Opinion holding that I also owned the forage on the ditch right of ways.
On several routes the so-called public footpaths right of ways were overgrown.
In advance of the new tap facility, Admiral Bay is completing right of ways and beginning construction of connecting pipelines to existing and newly permitted wells along the proposed pipeline.
Work will be performed in City right of ways and easements
Use this cutter when clearing pipeline and utility line right of ways.
New grid technologies in development by American Superconductor, Composite Technology Corporation, and 3M (Minnesota Mining & Manufacturing) have the potential to dramatically increase grid capacity through the installation of new cable on existing right of ways.
Congestion of underground right of ways brings increases in the inherent dangers associated with cutting lines .