riddle with

riddle someone or something with something

to fill someone or something with small holes, such as bullet holes. Max pulled the trigger of the machine gun and riddled Lefty with holes. The police riddled the wall with holes trying to shoot the escaped convict in the house.
See also: riddle

riddle with

v.
1. To pierce something in many places, especially with bullets or some other projectile: The troops riddled the side of the tank with gunfire.
2. To be permeated with some kind of puncture or hole. Used in the passive: The side of the house was riddled with bullet holes.
3. To be permeated in many places by something, especially by flaws. Used in the passive: That report was riddled with errors.
See also: riddle
References in periodicals archive ?
In these categories, there are unspoken rules where adults cannot participate, say, in the vulgar type with children, and thus children cannot riddle with each other if the riddle is vulgar in the presence of adults so as not to appear disrespectful.
And this is the riddle with which the sequence begins:
But "stamp" can also mean simply "crush or press," and Gollum quickly solves Bilbo's riddle with the words "Teeth
Tharsia's riddle lacks the subtle Christological overtones added by the Tristan author, but is surely the inspiration for the riddle with which the giant attempts to defeat the man who, it turns out, will be his killer.
After a brief discussion of the folk-riddling traditions from which Cao Xueqin, the novel's author, may have drawn some inspiration, Eber examines Cao's transformation of this rather light-hearted game, the folk riddle, into something altogether as serious as "the riddle of life and death, of existence and nonexistence, the riddle with no solution" (p.
Riddle's full affiliation with JHS could have a positive long term impact to the hospital as it provides Riddle with better access to capital and the inherent benefits of being part of a large healthcare system.