ribbon


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blue ribbon

1. noun A prize for first place. In contests, the person or thing that wins first place is often awarded a blue ribbon. Congratulations on winning the blue ribbon! It was certainly well-deserved—I never knew pecan pie could taste so good!
2. adjective (often hyphenated) By extension, something that is excellent, or the best of a particular group or category. Wow, Sharon, this is a blue-ribbon pie—I never knew pecan pie could taste so good!
See also: blue, ribbon

cut someone to ribbons

 
1. Lit. to cut or slice someone severely. He broke a mirror and the glass cut his hand to ribbons.
2. Fig. to criticize someone severely. The critics just cut her acting to ribbons!
See also: cut, ribbon

shot full of holes

 and shot to ribbons; shot to hell; shot to pieces 
1. Fig. [of an argument that is] demolished or comprehensively destroyed. Come on, that theory was shot full of holes ages ago. Your argument is all shot to hell.
2. to be very intoxicated due to drink or drugs. Tipsy? Shot to ribbons, more like! Boy, I really felt shot full of holes. I'll never drink another drop.
3. totally ruined. (Use hell with caution.) My car is all shot to hell and can't be depended on. This rusty old knife is shot to hell. I need a sharper one.
See also: full, hole, of, shot
References in classic literature ?
Topsy now confessed to the gloves, but still persisted in denying the ribbon.
He turned to a closet where his own orders were locked up, and took out two ribbons of the Order of the Garter.
So she scudded away up the ribbon, calling out to Maimie not to follow lest the Queen should mischief her.
These were so long that they reached to his feet, and both the hair and the beard were carefully plaited into many braids, and the end of each braid fastened with a bow of colored ribbon.
Some faint attempts she had made with blue ribbon, to freshen the appearance of a dingy curtain, she now saw to be piteous.
I venture, therefore, to propose that a small bell be procured, and attached by a ribbon round the neck of the Cat.
Her sash was only a wide ribbon, tied in a simple bow, and nothing but a blue snood in the pretty curls.
There were rosy bleeding-hearts and great splendid crimson peonies; white, fragrant narcissi and thorny, sweet Scotch roses; pink and blue and white columbines and lilac-tinted Bouncing Bets; clumps of southernwood and ribbon grass and mint; purple Adam-and-Eve, daffodils, and masses of sweet clover white with its delicate, fragrant, feathery sprays; scarlet lightning that shot its fiery lances over prim white musk-flowers; a garden it was where sunshine lingered and bees hummed, and winds, beguiled into loitering, purred and rustled.
It is stylish to pin a piece of ribbon on your coat the same colour as your chum wears in her hair.
The Cowardly Lion had a big bow of blue ribbon fastened to the long hair between his ears, and the Tiger wore a bow of red ribbon on his tail, just in front of the bushy end.
Instead, half a yard of bright ribbon was firmly attached to its leg--this the more easily to enable its flight being followed.
Honour did immediately as she was bid, and Sophia put her hat on; when, looking in the glass, she fancied the ribbon with which her hat was tied did not become her, and so sent her maid back again for a ribbon of a different colour; and then giving Mrs Honour repeated charges not to leave her work on any account, as she said it was in violent haste, and must be finished that very day, she muttered something more about going to the grove, and then sallied out the contrary way, and walked, as fast as her tender trembling limbs could carry her, directly towards the canal.
When, just before entering the ballroom, the princess, her mother, tried to turn right side out of the ribbon of her sash, Kitty had drawn back a little.
This time it was a small package, wrapped in tissue paper and tied with ribbon.
There were there a couple of reels of cotton, a packet of needles, a bit of silk ribbon, dark blue; a cabinet photograph, at which Hollis stole a glance before laying it on the table face downwards.