rhetorical question


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rhetorical question

A question asked without expecting an answer but for the sake of emphasis or effect. The expected answer is usually "yes" or "no." For example, Can we improve the quality of our work? That's a rhetorical question. [Late 1800s]
See also: question
References in periodicals archive ?
Ads appear to employ rhetorical question headlines more commonly than they use rhetorical questions repeatedly in the ad copy.
Thus, verse 7 serves as a double doubling; that is, a doubling of Israel's rhetorical question to the sons in 43:6 while simultaneously doubling the brothers' own rhetorical questions to Joseph in 37:8.
This rhetorical question could have led to a probing analysis of Lott's relationship to his home state, which has the nation's highest share of African Americans.
Rhetorical question of the week: Is there any wonder why bird flu is spreading in Turkey?
Posing the rhetorical question 'And why do I attach such importance to the future of the Naval Dockyard?
This rabble-rousing rhetorical question is first met by silence; but then one by one the Pseudo-sicarii timidly venture a series of answers: "Aqueducts?
Intensifying doubts will eventually lead even to negate the presented proposition--this is realized as a rhetorical question (see Matsumura 1971; Ono 1993; Sakakura 1993).
Occasionally the silhouette of an idea can be made out in the fog, but then another non-sequitur or mixed metaphor, another empty rhetorical question or meaningless chiasmus drifts across the page and restores the perfect obscurity.
Today the Casey for Governor campaign responded to Rendell for Governor spokesman Dan Fee's comments regarding the Casey campaign's rhetorical question about Ed Rendell: "How can the man who brought the Philadelphia schools to their knees put Pennsylvania back on its feet?
The answer, clearly, to his rhetorical question of who can "do justice" to his feelings at this moment is emphatic: no one, save the biblical narrator describing the great prophet's gaining not earthly liberation, but liberation from earth and entrance into heaven.
The marquee for the revival of what is perhaps Fosse's best show, Chicago, quotes a line from one of its songs, "Class," asking passersby on West 44th Street the presumably rhetorical question, "Ain't there no decency left?
This rhetorical question, posed by Commissioner Sheila F.
That last double-barreled rhetorical question neatly sums up the marketing strategy of AltaVista for the first four years of its life as it was passed between parents and foster parents, seemingly directionless.