rhetorical question

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rhetorical question

A question asked without expecting an answer but for the sake of emphasis or effect. The expected answer is usually "yes" or "no." For example, Can we improve the quality of our work? That's a rhetorical question. [Late 1800s]
See also: question
References in periodicals archive ?
But this shift in perspective notwithstanding, a number of studies on the general use of questions have tended to give rhetorical questions a cursory treatment, preferring to discuss rhetorical questions only when the need to distinguish them from other question-types arises.
As clearly summarized in the introduction by McKinnon, Asen, Chavez, and Howard, the turn to the field as the site of critical intervention complicates several of the rhetorical criticism's foundational concepts: text--context, critic--audience, audience--ethics, to name just a few.
In that essay, Aune offered "a framework for normative and empirical investigation" and "critical and comparative analysis of different rhetorical cultures" (pp.
Haas and Flower describe "rhetorical reading" as "constructing a rhetorical situation for the text [being read], trying to account for author's purpose, context, and effect on the audience" (176).
Part 1 searches the rhetorical background of Iago's and Othello's respective speech habits, the one characteristically ingenious and the other apodeictic.
Another way to indicate the compatibility of the approaches is to use Palmer's terms and concepts to describe the goals of rhetorical theory: narrative is a rich site for the formation of an intermental unit consisting of teller and audience or, more precisely, of the implied author and the flesh-and-blood readers who join the authorial audience (for rhetorical theory's take on audiences, see Rabinowitz).
The resulting relations are termed as coherence relations, discourse relations, conjunction relations and Rhetorical Relations.
Each chapter follows a similar organization: an introduction to the type of rhetorical analysis and an indication of the kinds of texts best suited to that analysis; the definition of key terms; a description of debates about the approach; a three-step "conducting an analysis" guide ("selecting an appropriate text," "examining the text," and "evaluating potential implications of the text") in which the author walks students though an essay; and sample essays.
The chapters on individual presidencies persuasively demonstrate the range of rhetorical behavior practiced by these nineteenth-century presidents.
One need not agree with With-erington's rhetorical analysis to benefit from much that is there.
McQuarrie and Mick define, explain, and differentiate various types of rhetorical figures (a visual embodiment of this historically linguistic notion should be possible), and develop the impact on consumer response that can be expected upon exposure to visual rhetorical figures in advertising.
Her rhetorical analysis of Ranke's histories, in particular, is convincing in its parsing of his de-rhetoricization strategies in the quest of "plausibility and comprehensibility in the historical narrative" (37).
Written within the context of a rich theater history that spans the twentieth century--from the early work of Alfred Harbage to postmodernist studies of Jean Howard and Douglas Bruster--Ira Clark's Rhetorical Readings, Dark Comedies, and Shakespeare's Problem Plays seeks to synthesize a number of strands of critical narrative in order to provide the thematic framework for a much-needed formalist attention to Shakespeare's famed problem plays.
There are fields of research on the Nicomachean Ethics which still need attention: the edition of the text the style and rhetorical and logical instruments employed by Aristotle in setting out his position.
As a teacher of rhetoric, it is tempting to respond reflexively to this posing of the rhetorical against the real; to say, as I often do, that there is nothing insubstantial or unreal about rhetoric.