revolt

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revolt against someone or something

to rebel or rise against someone or something. The citizens were gathering arms, preparing to revolt against the government.
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revolted at someone or something

sickened by someone or something. I was revolted at Frank and his behavior. We were all revolted at the scene of the bloody highway accident.
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References in classic literature ?
It is true, they realized that the Peasant Revolt was unplanned, and that the First Revolt was premature; but they little realized that the Second Revolt, planned and mature, was doomed to equal futility and more terrible punishment.
It is apparent that Avis Everhard completed the Manuscript during the last days of preparation for the Second Revolt; hence the fact that there is no mention of the disastrous outcome of the Second Revolt.
The commonest utterances of the commonest citizens in the time of the Colour Revolt seem to have been suffused with a richer tinge of word or thought; and to that era we are even now indebted for our finest poetry and for whatever rhythm still remains in the more scientific utterance of these modern days.
I command the Army of Revolt in this war," answered the General, with unnecessary sharpness.
You were not supposed to know it," she returned, "for we have kept it a secret; and considering that our army is composed entirely of girls," she added, with some pride, "it is surely a remarkable thing that our Revolt is not yet discovered.
The Army of Revolt only awaits my coming to march upon the Emerald City.
she said; "we are about to begin our great Revolt against the men of Oz
The boy followed after them, carrying several baskets and wraps and packages which various members of the Army of Revolt had placed in his care.
The Army of Revolt had become an Army of Conquerors!
Secondly and thirdly we may ascribe the rise of the new epic to the nature of the Boeotian people and, as already remarked, to a spirit of revolt against the old epic.
Byron (George Gordon Byron) expresses mainly the spirit of individual revolt, revolt against all existing institutions and standards.
In his uncontrolled zest for new sensations he finally tired of poetry, and in 1823 he accepted the invitation of the European committee in charge to become a leader of the Greek revolt against Turkish oppression.
Shelley resembles Byron in his thorough-going revolt against society, but he is totally unlike Byron in several important respects.
At Eton his hatred of tyranny was fiercely aroused by the fagging system and the other brutalities of an English school; he broke into open revolt and became known as 'mad Shelley,' and his schoolfellows delighted in driving him into paroxysms of rage.
Winning Revolutions: The Psychosocial Dynamics of Revolts for Freedom, Fairness, and Rights; 3 volume set