rev


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rev up

1. Of a motor, to increase very quickly or suddenly in rotational speed. Every night, at exactly 2 AM, I hear the sound of motorcycle engines revving up outside my house.
2. To increase the speed of a motor, usually a motor, very quickly or suddenly. In this usage, a noun or pronoun can be used between "rev" and "up." The driver beside me started revving up his engine while we waited for the light to turn green, egging me on to engage with him in a road race. Don't rev the motor up like that—it's really disturbing for everyone who lives in this neighborhood.
3. To begin rapidly increasing in intensity, activity, or amount. Sales of the product were pretty low for the first few months, but they really revved up once that famous rapper started talking about it on social media. Public interest in the election began revving up after one of the candidates made some controversial remarks during a radio interview.
4. To cause something to begin rapidly increasing in intensity, activity, or amount. In this usage, a noun or pronoun can be used between "rev" and "up." We started revving production up after it became clear that there was great public demand for the toy. We need to find a way to rev up public engagement with this issue.
See also: rev, up

rev something up

to make an idling engine run very fast, in short bursts of power. Hey! Stop revving it up! I wish that Tom wouldn't sit out in front of our house in his car and rev up his engine.
See also: rev, up

rev up

to increase in amount or activity. Production revved up after the strike. We're hoping business will rev up soon.
See also: rev, up

rev up

Increase the speed or rate of, enliven, stimulate, as in Bill revved up the motor, or They looked for ways to rev up the ad campaign. The verb rev is an abbreviation for revolution, alluding to the rate of rotation of an engine. The idiom dates from about 1920 and has been used figuratively since the mid-1900s.
See also: rev, up

rev up

v. Slang
1. To make some engine work faster by injecting it with fuel: The mechanic revved up the engine before the race. We revved the engine up and sped off.
2. To work faster due to an injection of fuel: The old car's engine revved up when I pushed the accelerator.
3. To make someone or something more lively or productive: We had a pep rally to rev ourselves up for the game. The administration is making efforts to rev up the economy.
4. To increase in rate, amount, or activity: Production revved up after the war started.
5. To improve the quality of something: We need to add something to this batter to rev up the flavor. Those candles really revved up the festive atmosphere.
See also: rev, up

rev

mod. revolting. Fix you hair! You are so rev!

rev something up

tv. to speed up an engine in short bursts. Tom sat at the traffic light revving up his engine.
See also: rev, something, up

revved (up)

mod. excited, perhaps by drugs. The kids were all revved up, ready to party.
See also: rev, up

revved

verb
See also: rev
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The notice specifically states that the IRS is troubled that changes in the marketplace may have made adherence to Rev.
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Welcome Opportunities'' will be the sermon delivered by the Rev.
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The Money Challenge,'' will be the sermon delivered by the Rev.
While in the custody of the Sumter County Detention Center in December of 2001, Rev.