(redirected from representing)
Also found in: Dictionary, Thesaurus, Legal.

represent someone in something

to act as one's advocate or agent in business or legal proceedings. My lawyer represented me in court. His attorney will represent him in all his dealings with the publishing company.
See also: represent

represent someone or something as something

to depict or portray someone or something as something; to think of someone or something as something. I don't think you should represent me as so perfect. After all, I'm human. The artist represented my puppy as a playful animal.
See also: represent

represent something to someone

1. to exemplify something to someone. What does this behavior represent to you? This represents a lapse in manners to me.
2. to explain a matter to someone. He represented the matter to me in a much more charitable light. I did not represent it properly to you.
See also: represent
References in classic literature ?
A party of leaden dragoons were galloping along one of the shelves, in equipments and uniform of modern cut; and there were some sugar figures, with no strong resemblance to the humanity of any epoch, but less unsatisfactorily representing our own fashions than those of a hundred years ago.
If it had been a former custom, perhaps her aunts would want her to do the right thing; for what else was she representing the family?
The most venerable and ornamental object is a chimney-piece set round with Dutch tiles of blue-figured China, representing scenes from Scripture; and, for aught I know, the lady of Pownall or Bernard may have sat beside this fireplace, and told her children the story of each blue tile.
But thither he had come, with a fair granddaughter under his arm; and there, amid all the mirth and buffoonery, stood this stern old figure, the best sustained character in the masquerade, because so well representing the antique spirit of his native land.
Translating the known characters, and representing the unknown by dots, as before, we read thus: th rtee.
The floor of the stage consisted of smooth boards, at the sides was some painted cardboard representing trees, and at the back was a cloth stretched over boards.
In the second act there was scenery representing tombstones, there was a round hole in the canvas to represent the moon, shades were raised over the footlights, and from horns and contrabass came deep notes while many people appeared from right and left wearing black cloaks and holding things like daggers in their hands.
They were strange ornaments to bring on a sea voyage--china pugs, tea-sets in miniature, cups stamped floridly with the arms of the city of Bristol, hair-pin boxes crusted with shamrock, antelopes' heads in coloured plaster, together with a multitude of tiny photographs, representing downright workmen in their Sunday best, and women holding white babies.
In these, instead or representing real people, the actors represented thoughts, feelings and deeds, good and bad.
It may be doubted, for instance, whether the Australian marsupials, which are divided into groups differing but little from each other, and feebly representing, as Mr.
In our diagram, this is indicated by the broken lines, beneath the capital letters, converging in sub-branches downwards towards a single point; this point representing a single species, the supposed single parent of our several new sub-genera and genera.
Representing Granite Branchburg LLC as the purchaser, Van Houten Group completed the sale of the 118,000 square foot distribution center located at 271 Chambers Brook Road in Branchburg, New Jersey.
On consummation of this proposal and the USDB transaction, BancWest would become the 27th largest depository organization in the United States, with total consolidated assets of $46 billion, and would control deposits of $30 billion, representing less than 1 percent of the total amount of deposits of insured depository institutions in the United States.
Representing the two halves of this reality are the two new Valley districts, A and B.
Would a film representing complex religious commitments be "box office," she asks rhetorically?