rent


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Related to rent: Rent a car

rent boy

A boy or young man who is a prostitute. Primarily heard in UK. The young man was taken from his parents and forced to work overseas as a rent boy.
See also: boy, rent

for rent

Available to be used by someone or something, in exchange for a certain fee. Hi, I see you've got a room for rent. May I fill out an application? That place has plenty of storage lockers for rent, should we need one.
See also: rent

rent out

To agree to allow someone to use something or occupy some place temporarily for payment or a series of payments. A noun or pronoun can be used between "rent" and "out." After business started declining, we began renting out our warehouses to help supplement our revenue stream. We also offer to rent the equipment out on daily, monthly, or yearly rates.
See also: out, rent

low-rent

1. Literally, not costing much to rent. Typically used before a noun. There is a serious shortage of low-rent accommodation in the city, which has led to a homelessness crisis unlike anything we've seen before. The university is converting some of its derelict properties into low-rent offices and studio apartments.
2. Very cheap or inferior in quality. You can tell these toys are just low-rent knockoffs of the original. The studio became infamous for pumping out low-rent horror films several times a year.
3. Having low moral and social standards. He planned the whole operation, then hired a couple low-rent goons to do the dirty work for him. What does some low-rent junkie like you know about an honest day's work?

rend from (someone or something)

To rip or tear something away from or off of someone or something in a violent, forceful manner. ("Rend" conjugates to either "rent" or "rended" in the past tense and past participle.) Doctors had to rend the clothes from the victim before the chemicals could cause any further damage. I nearly rent the hair from my head in anger. She rended the incriminating pages from the notebook and threw them in the fire.
See also: rend

rend (something) to (something)

To rip, tear, or split something apart into smaller pieces. ("Rend" conjugates to either "rent" or, less commonly, "rended" in the past tense and past participle.) He rent the contract to shreds when he realized that he'd be losing out on nearly 30% of the profits. I took the loaf of bread and rended it to pieces to share amongst the other starving children.
See also: rend

rend (something) in (something)

To rip, tear, or split something apart into smaller pieces. ("Rend" conjugates to either "rent" or, less commonly, "rended" in the past tense and past participle.) He rent the contract into shreds when he realized that he'd be losing out on nearly 30% of the profits. I took the loaf of bread and rended it into pieces to share amongst the other starving children. The huge barbarian threatened to rend his opponent in twain.
See also: rend

rend (something) into (something)

To rip, tear, or split something apart into smaller pieces. ("Rend" conjugates to either "rent" or, less commonly, "rended" in the past tense and past participle.) He rent the contract into shreds when he realized that he'd be losing out on nearly 30% of the profits. I took the loaf of bread and rended it into pieces to share amongst the other starving children.
See also: rend

render down

1. To liquefy and purify the fatty tissue of something by applying heat to it. A noun or pronoun can be used between "render" and "down." You'll want to render the duck fat down so that it can be used for cooking later. You'll want to cook the meat on a low temperature for several hours so that you can render down the fat without burning it. After you finish carving the roast chicken, you should put the carcass in some simmering water to render it down.
2. To discuss, think about, or deal with something at its most essential or basic elements. A noun or pronoun can be used between "render" and "down." It's a complicated issue, to be sure, but it can really be rendered down to a single question—are you in favor of higher taxes or not? These big decisions can be really overwhelming, so I always try to render them down in more concrete, objective terms.
3. To convert one or more source files on a computer to a different media format. A noun or pronoun can be used between "render" and "down." Every time I render the different audio tracks down to a single WAV, they become shifted slightly out of sync. I filmed the raw footage at 60 frames per second, but it always renders down to 24 frames per second. What am I doing wrong?
See also: down, render

render (something) in (something)

1. To represent, depict, or portray in some visual or verbal form. You input all your information into the app, and it renders your daily activity in an easy-to-understand graph. The author has the uncanny ability of rendering the most intimate, intangible experiences in stark and haunting prose.
2. To translate or express something in a different language. It's very difficult to render this in English, as it will inevitably lack some of the nuance found in the original German text. My job is to render the product's user manual in Japanese. The word is rendered in English as "dread."
3. To display converted digital information as a visual image or video using a particular software or program or within some place therein. A noun or pronoun can be used between "render" and "down." The program renders your picture in a preview box at the top of the screen so you have an idea of how your work will look. You'll have to render the raw files in a graphics processor and then save it as an MPEG or MP4.
4. To convert digital information on a computer into a particular media format. A noun or pronoun can be used between "render" and "down." I'm trying to render the various audio tracks in an MP3 file. I need to export the data and render it in a PDF.
See also: render

render (something) into (something)

1. To represent, depict, or portray in some visual or verbal form. You input all your information into the app, and it renders your daily activity into an easy-to-understand graph. The author has the uncanny ability of rendering the most intimate, intangible experiences into stark and haunting prose.
2. To translate or express something in a different language. It's very difficult to render this into English, as it will inevitably lack some of the nuance found in the original German text. My job is to render the product's user manual into Japanese. The word is rendered into English as "dread."
3. To convert digital information on a computer into a particular media format. A noun or pronoun can be used between "render" and "down." I'm trying to render the various audio tracks into an MP3 file. I need to export the data and render it into a PDF.
See also: render

render (something) to (someone or something)

1. To submit, present, or provide something to some other person, group, organization, etc. You will not legally own your car until you render your final loan repayment to the bank. We rendered our official opinion to the committee. Now it is up to them whether or not to take action.
2. To make something available to some other person, group, organization, etc. Our consulate is dedicated to rendering assistance to all US citizens who have been affected by the earthquake in Japan. I've rendered a service to you, and I expect to get paid for it!
3. To surrender, yield, or turn over something to some other person, group, organization, etc. He has been instructed by the court to render all funds and assets to the government. As a soldier, you must take an oath to render your life to your country and its defense.
See also: render

rent from (one)

1. To occupy the property of another person or company in return for an amount of money, typically fixed by contract and paid in regular intervals. I'm so tired of renting from greedy landlords and realtors. I've got a family renting from me while I work in Japan for the next year.
2. To obtain the use something that belongs to another person or company in return for an amount of money. We're going to rent bikes from the shop next to our hostel and take them around the city tomorrow. A local artist is renting some studio space from me at the moment.
See also: rent

room for rent

A room within a house or other building that one rents separately from the rest. I heard there's a room for rent in Anna's building. We're putting up our spare room for rent to make a little extra cash on the side.
See also: rent, room

render something down

 
1. Lit. to cook the fat out of something. Polly rendered the chicken fat down to a bit of golden grease that she would use in cooking a special dish. Jane rendered down the fat for use later. The cook rendered it down.
2. Fig. to reduce or simplify something to its essentials. Let's render this problem down to the considerations that are important to us. Can't we render down this matter into its essentials? Not all of this is important. Let's render it down.
See also: down, render

rent something from someone

to pay someone for the use of something. We rented a small car from one of the rental agencies. They rented a house from a local realtor.
See also: rent

rent something (out) (to someone)

to sell temporary rights for the use of something to someone. I rented the back room out to a nice young student. We rented the back room to someone. For how long did you rent it out? Let's rent out the garage.

rent out

v.
To grant temporary occupancy or use of some property or some service to someone in exchange for regular payments: I rented out the extra room over the garage to a college student. My parents rented our cabin out to one of my cousins.
See also: out, rent

low rent

1. n. a low person; someone without grace or spirit. (Also a rude term of address.) Look, low rent, where is what you owe me?
2. mod. cheap; unfashionable. This place is strictly low rent.
See also: low, rent

room for rent

n. a person who acts very stupid. (Also a term of address. This implies that one’s head is so empty of brains that the space could be rented out.) My brother is a room for rent if I ever saw one. What a dope!
See also: rent, room

for rent

Available for use or service in return for payment.
See also: rent
References in periodicals archive ?
However, if leasehold improvements are made in lieu of rent, the lessor recognizes income on the receipt of such improvements and can depreciate its basis in them; the lessee will deduct rent rather than depreciation.
So, even though the $875 flat rent for their three-bedroom apartment is less, it's still roughly 30 percent more than what the family has been paying.
First, a lease is not a section 467 rental agreement if it specifies equal amounts of rent for each month throughout the lease term and all rent payments are due in the calendar year to which the rent relates (or the preceding or succeeding calendar year).
If a lease is subject to those rules, the IRS may ignore its express terms and redetermine the amounts of income allocable to the landlord and rent deductible by the tenant (based on the present value of future lease payments).
It was also common for widowed farm women to rent out their farm especially if no sons were able or willing to work it.
however, some folks seem worried that Rent and Angels have all too much in common.
When contrasted with similarly sized cities and surrounding Los Angeles County, Santa Monica experienced disproportional decreases in precisely the populations targeted for "protection" by rent control--the elderly, the handicapped, single-parent households, the less educated, the working poor.
For those who choose to rent, apartment selection hinges on specific available amenities and community features.
Previously, a cash basis lessor could defer income until payment was received, while an accrual basis lessee could deduct an amount for rent properly allocable to each year of the lease (even though the amount was not payable until a later year).
The program he has benefited from for the past ten years is rent control, and few New Yorkers are demanding an end to the inequity.
In selected major retail corridors, the ground floor median asking rent was up 26 percent on Madison Avenue to $1000 per square foot.