relapse into

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relapse into something

to experience a return to a worse condition. Valerie relapsed into a coma in the afternoon. Mary relapsed into her depression after a brief period of normalcy.
References in periodicals archive ?
The investigators also found that prolonging intensive-phase treatment and overall treatment by at least 50% reduced the relapse rate (odds ratio 0.
For many years, scientists have associated the hippocampus with drug-experience memories, but research hadn't revealed any physiological pathway leading from memory to relapse, says Vorel.
CNS relapse occurred in 17 (81%) patients within six months after completion of therapy.
Conclusion: Relapse in acute lymphoblastic leukaemia was common, although treatment modalities are improving day by day.
A relapse is defined as the recurrence of the disease at any time after the completion of a full course of treatment with WHO recommended MDT.
The distinction between relapse and reinfection is very difficult due to non availability as well as inaccurate results of newer diagnostic methods4-6.
One possible reason behind a relapse is the lack or loss of ties to a support group, recovery program, faith community, or family.
They were counseled about the early warning signs of relapse and urged to contact their psychiatrist in the event they noticed a signal.
Relapse is a complex and dynamic phenomenon that appears to be determined by both neurobiological and psychosocial processes.
Theoretical models of alcohol relapse have suggested that stress is a major contributor, and this relationship is mediated, at least in part, by characteristics such as personality disorders and onset of alcohol use.
The observation of the vitamin's effect on melanoma relapse emerged from a case-control study that included 143 patients who relapsed more than 3 years after surgical removal of their primary tumor, and 189 patients matched for age, sex, and Breslow thickness who did not relapse.
A drug originally devised to prevent immune rejection of organ transplants can lessen relapses in patients with multiple sclerosis, a new study finds.
Researchers from Toronto's Princess Margaret Hospital recently showed that the 5-year breast cancer relapse rate was significantly lower in 386 women over age 50 who were treated with the combination of radiation and tamoxifen after lumpectomy, compared with 383 women who were treated with lumpectomy and tamoxifen alone (N.
azathioprine, cyclosporine, and cyclophosphamide) are generally reserved for cases that are refractory to initial treatment or that relapse following treatment with a first-line modality.