reflect

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reflect (back) (up)on someone or something

to remember or think about someone or something. (Upon is formal and less commonly used than on.) When I reflect back on the years I spent with my parents, I think I had a good childhood. I like to reflect on my great-grandmother.
See also: on, reflect

reflect credit (up)on someone or something

[for some act] to bring credit to someone or something. (Upon is formal and less commonly used than on.) Your efforts really reflect credit upon you. Mary's success really reflected credit on the quality of her education.
See also: credit, on, reflect

reflected in something

 
1. Lit. [of something] mirrored in something, such as a mirror, water, ice, etc. His image was reflected in the mirror, giving him a good view of his sunburn. When the hermit's image was reflected in the pool, he was amazed.
2. Fig. [of something] shown in a result. The extra charges will be reflected in next month's bill. I do not understand all the charges that are reflected in my statement.
See also: reflect

reflect on something

also reflect upon something
to think seriously about something Her essay invites the reader to reflect on the importance of art in people's lives.
See also: on, reflect

reflect on somebody/something

to influence the reputation of a person, group, or organization The outstanding work of our scientists reflects well on the entire university. If someone on our staff does a bad job, it reflects badly on all of us.
Usage notes: always used with an adverb and said of both good and bad influences on a reputation
See also: on, reflect

reflect on

1. Consider or think carefully about, as in She reflected on her country's role in history. [c. 1600] A closely related phrase is on due reflection, meaning "after careful consideration." For example, On due reflection I decided to vote for the incumbent.
2. reflect on one. Give evidence of one's qualities, as in The hasty preparation of this report will reflect on you. [Second half of 1600s]
See also: on, reflect

reflect on

or reflect upon
v.
1. To think carefully about something: He sat in the garden and reflected on what he had just read.
2. To express carefully considered thoughts about something: In the essay, she reflects on her long career and offers advice for young writers.
3. To give evidence of the characteristics or qualities of someone or something: The student's performance reflects well on the whole school. Hasty preparation of the report will reflect badly on you.
4. To appear as a reflected image on some surface: The trees are reflecting on the water.
5. To cause something to appear as a reflected image on some surface: The window reflected wavy lines on the floor.
See also: on, reflect
References in periodicals archive ?
Reflecting the difficulties in the manufacturing sector, real spending for industrial equipment dropped at an annual rate of more than 20 percent, after smaller declines during the preceding five quarters.
Second, federal outlays related to deposit insurance were well below expectations during the first quarter, mainly reflecting the slow pace at which insolvent thrift institutions were resolved.
Subsequently, the dollar surged through the end of March, largely reflecting the quick end of the war and the resulting expectation of an early rebound in the U.
Real merchandise imports declined in the first quarter to a level about 5 percent below that in the third quarter of 1990, with the drop largely reflecting the weakness in domestic demand.
Employment in finance, insurance, and real estate-which continued to rise during past recessions-edged lower this time, reflecting the shakeout in the financial sector and spillovers from the slump in real estate markets.
Although this slowing of labor-cost inflation was apparent in both wages and benefits, the latter component of compensation decelerated the most sharply, reflecting declines in nonproduction bonuses and pension contributions per hour of work.
In May, consumer energy prices edged back up, mainly reflecting price increases for gasoline, the largest component of the CPI for energy.
Price developments at earlier stages of processing have been favorable this year, reflecting the easing of capacity pressures and price declines for petrochemical products.
In March, however, long-term market rates began to firm, reflecting the rebound in consumer confidence and initial indications of a turnaround in the housing market, which were seen as pointing to a somewhat shorter and milder recession than many had previously feared.
Interest rates generally declined during April, mainly at the short end, reflecting market participants' disappointment that the response to earlier monetary easings and to the rebound in consumer confidence they had expected had yet to show through in measures of economic activity.
Loss provisions made by other large banks nearly doubled as a share of assets last year, likely reflecting a deterioration in the quality of real estate loans as well as developing country debt (table 5).
But dividends as a share of profits surged at large banks other than money centers, reflecting mainly the maintenance of dividend payouts in the face of a substantial decline in profitability.
As a whole, the banking industry added less equity last year than it did in 1988, reflecting the very low level of retained earnings and the damping effect of the fall in bank stock prices in late 1989 on the incentive to issue new equity.