reefer


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reefer

(ˈrifɚ)
1. n. a refrigerator. A new reefer costs nearly $1,000!
2. and reef n. cannabis; a marijuana cigarette. (Drugs. Akin to greefo.) He had a fat reef in his hand when he was busted.
References in periodicals archive ?
Gareth Madsen, head of reefer management, UASC commented: "The progressive expansion of UASC's fleet of refrigerated units ensures enhanced reefer availability for all our customers.
However, the report noted that although the specialized reefer fleet provided little more than 7% of overall reefer capacity, it carried almost 28% of the estimated perishable reefer cargo in 2013.
The top six specialized reefer operators control 52% of capacity.
However, while cargoes are expected to rise by 50% over the next five to ten years due to new products and new markets, a shortage of reefer ship new build is causing a potential bottleneck in cargo transit.
Minneapolis-based Thermo King, for instance, has developed the Smart Reefer controller, a microprocessor whose simplified operation makes it easy for the driver to maintain ideal conditions inside the trailer and monitor system performance to reduce fuel consumption and unit downtime.
Det Con Melrose said two ounces would be enough for 300 reefer cigarettes a week - which would equate to a 40a-day habit.
He is to begin shooting later this month in Vancouver on the film version of notorious cannabis musical Reefer Madness and wanted Honey along for the duration of the shoot.
The Scots star will play anti-pot campaigner The Lecturer, the film's narrator, and Campbell will play Miss Poppy, the proprietor of a dance hall, in Reefer Madness.
Reefer Madness: Sex, Drugs, and Cheap Labor in the American Black Market by Eric Schlosser Houghton Mifflin.
The blond's got a reefer in her mouth and an empty glass in her left hand.
P&O Nedlloyd has placed a record order for reefer containers worth in excess of $200 million.
The reefer units reduce the refrigeration system's projection into a 20-foot container by 20 per cent, making possible a potential internal volume of 30 cubic meters for payload.
Mann first heard about him when he found a book called Reefer Madness in the early 1980s.
The reefer share of containerized cargo is now about 9 percent and accounts for about 20 million tons of cargo annually.