red tide


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red tide

n. a menstrual period. (Punning on the name of a tidal phenomenon where the water appears reddish owing to the presence of certain kinds of microscopic creatures.) Sorry, she’s down with the red tide and really prefers to stay home.
See also: red, tide
References in periodicals archive ?
Right now, we have few options for controlling or reducing red tide blooms, so we have to focus on how we can help communities mitigate the impacts," said Dr.
Fish that sense red tide may not bite for days at a time, so if you can't catch anything in your favorite spot when red tide is nearby it doesn't necessarily mean that all your fish have died.
Red tides affected the country's eastern shores in 2008 and 2009, resulting in the death of a large number of fish.
Red tide is a common name for a phenomenon known as an algal bloom (large concentrations of aquatic microorganisms) when it is caused by a few species of dinoflagellates and the bloom takes on a red or brown color.
To the investigators' surprise, three-compounds actually mitigated the classical red tide toxicities.
Red tide refers to about 60 potentially deadly oceanic biotoxins.
Several oyster farmers and other industries took a knock and some even went under during the extreme red tide outbreak in March 2008.
A majority of anglers ascribed the decreased catches to the after-effects of the red tide that hit the shores of the sultanate in January.
Surveys conducted in the fall of 2007 showed abundant levels of dormant, seed-like cysts of Alexandrium in seatloor sediments--30 percent more than were counted before the historic red tide bloom of 2005.
He said clamming was better money but there was a red tide.
Brian Ashton's team, World Cup Finalists just 10 weeks ago, were swept aside by a red tide.
Red tide is also linked to the upwelling but is not the same phenomenon.
At its peak, the 2005 red tide covered more than 67,000 square kilometers of shallow coastal waters--an area larger than the state of West Virginia.
Red tide (Alexandrium fundyense) on the Cape and north as far as Isle au Haut in Maine played havoc with many of these filter feeders in 2005.
Like humans, fish and wildlife are suffering from both man-made pollutants like lead, mercury and arsenic, and natural toxins like red tide.