record

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broken record

A person or thing that repeats itself over and over again. Likened to vinyl records that when severely scratched (i.e., "broken") can loop over the same recorded segment endlessly. I feel like a broken record having to tell you this each day, but please clean your room!
See also: broken, record

there's one for (record) the book(s)

That is a remarkable, unusual, and unexpected event, occurrence, or piece of news. Primarily heard in US. Mr. Literature Snob reading a trashy romance novel? Now there's one for the books! A: "After the concert, I ran into the singer at a pub down the road from the venue. It turns out his mother went to the same school as mine!" B: "Wow, there's one for the record book!"
See also: one

matter of record

A recorded or proven fact. His tardiness is a matter of record now, so it will definitely affect his performance review.
See also: matter, of, record

break a record

to destroy a previously set high record by setting a new one. The athlete broke all the school records in swimming. The league record was broken after thirty years.
See also: break, record

fall short of one's goal(s)

 and fall short of the goal(s); fall short of the record
to fail to achieve a goal. We fell short of our goal of collecting a thousand dollars. Ann ran a fast race, but fell short of the record.
See also: fall, goal, of, short

for the record

so that (one's own version of) the facts will be known; for open, public knowledge. (This often is said when there are reporters present.) I'd like to say—for the record—that at no time have I ever accepted a bribe from anyone. For the record, I've never been able to get anything done around city hall without bribing someone.
See also: record

off the record

Fig. unofficial; informal. (Of comments to the press that one does not want reported.) This is off the record, but I disagree with the mayor on this matter. Although her comments were off the record, the newspaper published them anyway.
See also: off, record

on record

 and on the books
recorded for future reference. We had the coldest winter on record last year. This is the fastest race on record.
See also: on, record

record something from something

to make an audio or video recording of something from some source. Listen to this. I recorded it from a radio broadcast. From what TV show did you record this?
See also: record

record something in something

to enter a record of something into something. I will record your appointment in my notebook. Jane recorded the memo in her computer.
See also: record

record something on something

to make a record of something on the surface of something. Nancy recorded the appointment on the calendar that served as a blotter on the top of her desk. Please record this on your calendar.
See also: on, record

set someone straight

to make certain that someone understands something exactly. (Often said in anger or domination.) Please set me straight on this matter. Do you or do you not accept the responsibility for the accident? I set her straight about who she had to ask for permission to leave early.
See also: set, straight

set something straight

 and put something straight
to figure out and correct something; to straighten out a mess. I am sorry for the error. I am sure we can set it straight. We'll put this matter straight in a short time.
See also: set, straight

set the record straight

Fig. to put right a mistake or misunderstanding; to make sure that an account, etc., is correct. The manager thought Jean was to blame, but she soon set the record straight. Jane's mother heard that Tom is a married man, but he set the record straight. He's divorced.
See also: record, set, straight

sound like a broken record

to say the same thing over and over again. (Fig. on a scratch in a phonograph record causing the needle [or stylus] to stay in the same groove and play it over and over.) He's always complaining about the way she treats him. He sounds like a broken record! I hate to sound like a broken record, but we just don't have enough people on the payroll to work effciently.
See also: broken, like, record, sound

a matter of record

a fact recorded in writing The judgment of the court is a matter of record.
See also: matter, of, record

for the record

1. officially and publicly He is a Congressman known for saying what other politicians will not say for the record.
2. (spoken) so that the facts are clear Just for the record, I was not even born when the events I'm describing happened.
See also: record

off the record

not intended to be known publicly or recorded officially She claims the newspaper published comments about the incident that were supposed to be off the record.
Opposite of: on (the) record
See also: off, record

on (the) record

known or recorded officially and publicly He is on the record as saying that I was not involved in this decision. The number of murders this year is the lowest on record for this city since the 1920s.
Usage notes: sometimes used in the phrase go on the record (make something known officially and publicly): These women are willing to go on the record with charges against their boss.
Opposite of: off the record
See also: on, record

set the record straight

to tell the true facts that have not been accurately reported If we are wrong and Brian would like to set the record straight, he should come talk to us.
Related vocabulary: set somebody/something straight
See also: record, set, straight

set somebody/something straight

to tell someone the true facts about a situation that they had not understood correctly If you think we won't be affected by what's happening in Asia, our chief economist would like to set you straight.
Related vocabulary: set the record straight
See also: set, straight

be a matter of record

if a fact is a matter of record, you know it is true because it has been written down His views on immigration are a matter of record.
See also: matter, of, record

for the record

something that you say when you are about to tell someone something important that you want them to remember Just for the record, I've never been to his house and I've only met him a few times, whatever the media is saying.
See also: record

go on record

to publicly and officially tell people your opinion about something (often + as + doing sth) Are you prepared to go on record as supporting the council on this issue?
See also: on, record

off the record

if you say something off the record, you do not want it to be publicly reported She made it clear that her comments were strictly off the record and should not be included in the article.
See also: off, record

put/set the record straight

to tell the true facts about a situation in order to show people that what they believed previously was not correct She is writing her memoirs to set the record straight once and for all.
See also: put, record, straight

a track record

all of the past achievements or failures of a person or organization We like to recruit managers with a strong track record. (often + in ) They have a strong track record in rescuing ailing companies.
See also: record, track

break the record

1. Surpass a previous achievement, as in He was determined to break the record for the high jump. This usage is applied primarily to sports of various kinds. [1880s]
2. Move very fast, as in The lecture was so dull that we broke the record getting to the door: [Second half of 1900s]
See also: break, record

go on record

Embrace a position publicly. For example, I want to go on record in favor of the mayor's reelection. It is also put as for the record, as in For the record, we support sending troops there. The record in both signifies either publication or public knowledge. Both expressions date from the first half of the 1900s, although slightly different phrases, such as put on record, are older. Also see just for the record; off the record.
See also: on, record

just for the record

Let's get things straight; also, let me make myself clear. For example, Just for the record, we never endorsed this idea, or Just for the record, I didn't vote for him. This usage employs record in the sense of "public knowledge." [Mid-1900s] Also see go on record; set (the record) straight.
See also: just, record

off the record

Unofficially, in confidence, not for publication, as in What he was about to say, he told the reporters, was strictly off the record. Probably alluding to striking evidence from a court record (because it is irrelevant or improper), this term came into wide use in the mid-1900s, especially with reference to persons who did not wish to be quoted by journalists. For antonyms, see go on record; just for the record.
See also: off, record

set straight

Correct someone by providing accurate information; also, make an arrangement honest or fair. For example, Let me set you straight about Lisa; she's never actually worked for us, or To set matters straight I'll pay you back Monday. It is sometimes put as set the record straight, meaning "correct an inaccurate account," as in Just to set the record straight, we arrived at ten. [First half of 1900s]
See also: set, straight

track record

A record of actual performance or achievements, as in This applicant has an excellent track record. This term probably comes from horse racing, where it signifies the best time a horse has ever achieved at a particular track or over a particular distance. However, some believe it alludes to track and field records. Its figurative use dates from the late 1940s.
See also: record, track

go on record

To embrace a certain position publicly: go on record in favor of the mayor's reelection.
See also: on, record

off the record

Not for publication: The senator told the reporters that his remarks were strictly off the record.
See also: off, record

on record

Known to have been stated or to have taken a certain position: The senator's opposition to the new legislation is on record.
See also: on, record

set (someone) straight

To inform (someone) of the truth of a situation.
See also: set, straight

like a broken record

To repeat and repeat ad nauseam. Vinyl records, as those readers who remember them will recall, have spiraling grooves in which the photograph needle picked up the sound. When a groove developed a crack or other imperfection, the needle became stuck and the sound kept repeating until someone moved the phonograph arm to the next groove. The expression was applied to anyone who repeated a remark or request over and over until it sounded like a broken record . . . a broken record . . . a broken record.
See also: broken, like, record

long-playing record

A 33 1/3 rpm vinyl phonograph record. Abbreviated LP, a long-playing record that was played at 33 revolutions per minute held more music than did a 45 rpm extended-play record or their 78 rpm shellac and later vinyl predecessor. A 16 rpm record never achieved much popularity.
See also: record
References in classic literature ?
Sherlock Holmes sat moodily at one side of the fireplace cross-indexing his records of crime, while I at the other was deep in one of Clark Russell's fine sea-stories until the howl of the gale from without seemed to blend with the text, and the splash of the rain to lengthen out into the long swash of the sea waves.
From the records of the Colonial Office and from the dead man's diary we learn that a certain young English nobleman, whom we shall call John Clayton, Lord Greystoke, was commissioned to make a peculiarly delicate investigation of conditions in a British West Coast African Colony from whose simple native inhabitants another European power was known to be recruiting soldiers for its native army, which it used solely for the forcible collection of rubber and ivory from the savage tribes along the Congo and the Aruwimi.
This may perhaps be allowed true with regard to poetry, but it may be thought impracticable to extend it to the historian; for he is obliged to record matters as he finds them, though they may be of so extraordinary a nature as will require no small degree of historical faith to swallow them.
This envelope had the air of an official record of some period long past, when clerks engrossed their stiff and formal chirography on more substantial materials than at present.
The idea of our having to record in the same book with brats like that
And, among the worthy people who have so kindly received us, I revise my record of these adventures once more.
No man," Poe himself wrote, "has recorded, no man has dared to record, the wonders of his inner life.
There are about thirty cases on record, of which the most famous, that of the Countess Cornelia de Baudi Cesenate, was minutely investigated and described by Giuseppe Bianchini, a prebendary of Verona, otherwise distinguished in letters, who published an account of it at Verona in 1731, which he afterwards republished at Rome.
The memory may hold record of everything, as it is believed, but it will not be easily entreated to give up its facts, and I find myself striving in vein to recall the things that I must have read that year in the country.
Browning has given us the key, and those volumes a delightful gift to our age-record of so much that is richest in the world of things, and men, and their works--all so much the richer by the great intellect, the great imagination, which has made the record, transmuted them into imperishable things of art:--
Immediately this musty record of man's land lust assumes the formidableness of a battle--the quick struggling with the dust.
Undoubtedly she was executed by the Mercenaries; and, as is well known, no record of such executions was kept by the Iron Heel.
The explanation lies, as I believe, in the extreme imperfection of the geological record.
One or two stiff gales and the springing of a leak are accidents which experienced navigators scarcely remember to record, and I shall be well content if nothing worse happen to us during our voyage.
Bruff thinks as I think, that the whole story ought, in the interests of truth, to be placed on record in writing--and the sooner the better.
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