receive

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Related to receiving: Receiving stolen property

receive the fright of (one's) life

To experience an extreme and sudden sensation of shock, surprise, or fear. I received the fright of my life when I noticed someone standing right behind me. Mary received the fright of her life as the car ahead of her swerved across traffic.
See also: fright, life, of, receive

sneck posset

archaic A rejection, refusal, or cold reception; a closed door (as on a visitor). Primarily heard in UK. After receiving a veritable sneck posset from his wealthy distant relations, Milton set to drinking in the town's tavern for want of any other recourse.
See also: posset, sneck

receive (one's) just deserts

To receive that which one deserves, especially a punishment or unfavorable outcome. (Note: The phrase is often misspelled as "just desserts," due to the pronunciation of "deserts" and "desserts" being the same in this context.) The CEO cheated his clients out of nearly $4 million, but he received his just deserts when he was stripped of everything he owned and sent to prison.
See also: desert, just, receive

at the receiving end

In the position of getting something (from someone else). Typically, the one "at the receiving end" is the recipient of some behavior or action perceived to be harmful or negative. Look, I know you're having a tough time at work, but I'm sick of being at the receiving end of your temper every night! I'd hate to be at the receiving end of one of his roundhouse kicks.
See also: end, receive

receive (someone or something) with open arms

1. To greet someone very happily and eagerly; to give someone a very warm, enthusiastic welcome. When my brother left for the military, he and I didn't really get along too well, but now that he's coming home, I can't wait to receive him with open arms. It was a little intimidating starting a new job at such a large firm, but everyone there received me with open arms.
2. To be very pleased and enthusiastic about something, especially that which is new or unexpected. The president has announced a reversal on his controversial policy, and many people are receiving the news with open arms.
See also: arm, open, receive

be on the receiving end

To be in the position of getting something (from someone else). Typically, the one "on the receiving end" is the recipient of some behavior or action perceived to be harmful or negative. Look, I know you're having a tough time at work, but I'm sick of being on the receiving end of your temper every night! I'd hate to be on the receiving end of one of his roundhouse kicks.
See also: end, on, receive

on the receiving end

In the position of getting something (from someone else). Typically, the one "on the receiving end" is the recipient of some behavior or action perceived to be harmful or negative. Look, I know you're having a tough time at work, but I'm sick of being on the receiving end of your temper every night! I'd hate to be on the receiving end of one of his roundhouse kicks.
See also: end, on, receive

word

1. A message from someone or something. I just got word that Diana landed in New York.
2. slang An expression of affirmation. A: "That concert was amazing!" B: "Word."

It is better to give than to receive.

 and It is more blessed to give than to receive.
Prov. It is more virtuous to give things than to get them. (Biblical.) Susan told her children, "Instead of thinking so much about what you want for your birthday, think about what to give your brothers and sisters for their birthdays. Remember, it is better to give than to receive." Our charity encourages you to share the good things you have. It is more blessed to give than to receive.
See also: better, give, receive

receive someone as someone or something

to welcome and accept someone as someone or something. The king received the ambassador as an honored guest. They said they would receive their former guest as a welcome visitor.
See also: receive

receive someone into something

to welcome someone into something, some place, or some organization. Everyone received the new member into the club with eager congratulations. We received them into our homes and fed them well.
See also: receive

receive someone or something back

to get someone or something back. Martha received her husband back after his escapade. I sent a letter off with the wrong postage and received it back two weeks later.
See also: back, receive

receive someone with open arms

 and welcome someone with open arms 
1. Lit. to greet someone with arms spread wide to hug someone. His mother greeted him with open arms at the door.
2. Fig. to greet someone eagerly. I'm sure they wanted us to stay for dinner. They received us with open arms. When I came home from college, the whole family welcomed me with open arms.
See also: arm, open, receive

receive something from some place

to get and accept something from some place. I just received a letter from Budapest! Mary received a package from Japan.
See also: place, receive

receive something from someone

to get and accept something from someone. Tony received a sweater from his grandfather for his birthday. Who did you receive this from?
See also: receive

receive word

(from someone or something) Go to word (from someone or something).
See also: receive, word

*word (from someone or something)

messages or communication from someone or something. (*Typically: get ~; have ~; hear ~; receive ~.) We have just received word from Perry that the contract has been signed.

on the receiving end

In the situation of recipient, especially of something unpleasant, as in It seems I'm always on the receiving end of his bad moods. [c. 1930]
See also: end, on, receive

be at (or on) the receiving end

be subjected to something unpleasant. informal
See also: end, receive

be on/at the reˈceiving end (of something)

(informal) be the person that an action, etc. is directed at, especially an unpleasant one: He’s been on the receiving end of a lot of criticism recently.
See also: end, on, receive

Word

1. and Word up. interj. Correct.; Right. I hear you, man. Word.
2. interj. Hello. (see also What’s the (good) word?.) Word. What’s new? A: Word. B: Word.
References in periodicals archive ?
Assuming the required agreements are in place, transacting cross-border payments is a process that uses the existing clearinghouse network infrastructure to settle payments between the originating depository financial institution and originating gateway operator, and between the receiving gateway operator and receiving depository financial institution.
For example, the estimated annual costs of receiving and reconciling business information returns received on a calendar-year basis range from $10,000 to $2,000,000, whereas the range under a fiscal-year program was reported to be from $30,000 to $2,000,000.
Provide receiving workers copies of the original purchase orders but with the quantities ordered blanked out.
Refinancing replacement property after an exchange: In another tax planning strategy, the client can complete the tax-free exchange first and then refinance the replacement property, thereby receiving the refinancing proceeds tax free.
In the third week, absent any administrative delay by the state, employees will begin receiving their paid family leave partial wage replacement benefits, which will continue for five more weeks.
The proportions who were Hispanic, came from Mexico and spoke only Spanish were significantly larger among women receiving collaborative care (55-86%) than among those getting traditional care (26-61%).
401(a)(9)-7, Q&A-2, states that if an amount distributed by one plan (distributing plan) is rolled over to another plan (receiving plan), the benefit of the employee under the receiving plan is increased by the amount rolled over for purposes of determining the RMD for the calendar year immediately following the one in which the rollover is distributed.
Grade 3/4 infusion reactions, rarely with fatal outcome (less than 1 in 1000), occurred in approximately 3% (46/1485) of patients receiving ERBITUX (Cetuximab) therapy, characterized by rapid onset of airway obstruction (bronchospasm, stridor, hoarseness), urticaria, hypotension, and/or cardiac arrest.
Because the $100 relinquished liability is offset by the $60 replacement liability, P is treated as receiving $40 of money or other property; thus, it recognizes a $40 gain in year 1, which is allocated $20 to each partner (as part of his or her distributive share of P's year 1 income).
Grade 3/4 infusion reactions, rarely with fatal outcome (<1 in 1000), occurred in approximately 3% (46/1485) of patients receiving ERBITUX (Cetuximab) therapy, characterized by rapid onset of airway obstruction (bronchospasm, stridor, hoarseness), urticaria, hypotension, and/or cardiac arrest.
The above discussion on the tax treatment of damage awards from securities-related disputes also applies to investors receiving damages for losses in their personal retirement accounts.
As a result of both years of economic growth and a trend in many industries toward consolidation, owners of closely held businesses are receiving (and accepting) rewarding offers to sell their businesses in record numbers.