reason

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Related to reasoned: steadying

by reason of

Due to; on account, because, or as a result of. By reason of this being the defendant's first offense, we've decided to pursue a lenient sentence. The game was canceled by reason of a huge storm heading toward the stadium.
See also: of, reason

for XYZ reasons

For various unknown or unspecifiable reasons. Primarily heard in US, South Africa. Many people don't like country music for XYZ reasons, but I've always really enjoyed it.
See also: reason, XYZ

rhyme or reason

The particular logic, sense, method, or meaning of a given situation, action, person, thing, group, etc. (Most often used in negative formations to indicate an absence or lack thereof.) Could someone please explain to me the rhyme or reason behind the program's selection process? I've looked over it several times, but there's no rhyme or reason to the agreement we were sent this morning.
See also: reason, rhyme

contrary to all reason

Despite what definitely should be the case. Describes an occurence that is unthinkable or unimaginable. And then, contrary to all reason, I found that my bank account was totally depleted. There should have still been thousands of dollars in there!
See also: all, contrary, reason

all the more reason for (doing something)

 and all the more reason to (do something)
with even better reason or cause for doing something. (Can be included in a number of grammatical constructions.) Bill: I don't do well in calculus because I don't like the stuff. Father: All the more reason for working harder at it. Bob: I'm tired of painting this fence. It's so old it's rotting! Sally: All the more reason to paint it.
See also: all, more, reason

It (only) stands to reason.

It is only reasonable to hold a certain opinion. It stands to reason that most people will not buy a new car if they don't think they can pay for it. I think he will come back to pick up his check. It only stands to reason.
See also: reason, stand

listen to reason

to yield to a reasonable argument; to take the reasonable course. Please listen to reason, and don't do something you'll regret. She got into trouble because she wouldn't listen to reason.
See also: listen, reason

lose one's reason

Fig. to lose one's power of reasoning, possibly in anger. I was so confused that I almost lost my reason. Bob seems to have lost his reason when he struck John.
See also: lose, reason

*neither rhyme nor reason

Cliché without logic, order, or planning. (Describes something disorganized. *Typically: be ~; have ~.) There seems to be neither rhyme nor reason to Gerald's filing system. The novel's plot had neither rhyme nor reason.
See also: neither, nor, reason, rhyme

no earthly reason

no conceivable reason. There is no earthly reason for your rude behavior. I can think of no earthly reason why the repairs should cost so much.
See also: earthly, reason

reason against something

to argue against something, using reason. I can hardly be expected to reason against a silly argument like that! I reasoned against it, but they paid no attention to me.
See also: reason

reason something out

to figure something out; to plan a reasonable course of action. Now let's be calm and try to reason this out. Let us reason out our difficulties.
See also: out, reason

reason with someone

to discuss something with someone, seeking a reasonable solution to a problem. Try to reason with Jill. If she won't listen, forget her. You cannot reason with someone who is so narrow-minded.
See also: reason

stand to reason

to seem reasonable. It stands to reason that it'll be colder in January than it is in November. It stands to reason that Bill left in a hurry, although no one saw him go.
See also: reason, stand

within reason

reasonable; reasonably. You can do anything you want within reason. I'll pay any sum you askwithin reason.
See also: reason, within

without rhyme or reason

Cliché without purpose, order, or reason. (See variations in the examples. Fixed order.) The teacher said my report was disorganized. My paragraphs seemed to be without rhyme or reason. Everything you do seems to be without rhyme or reason.
See also: reason, rhyme, without

for some reason (or other)

there could be many explanations why For some reason or other, my son prefers to have a huge lizard rather than a dog or cat for a pet.
See also: reason

listen to reason

to be influenced by arguments It's too bad we had to take this problem to court, but that man wouldn't listen to reason.
Usage notes: often used in the form not listen to reason, as in the example
See also: listen, reason

stand to reason

to seem likely to be true It stands to reason that the more experience you have, the better you'll be at solving problems.
See also: reason, stand

with good reason

also for good reason
because of something obviously true Roberta refused to respond to the charge, and with good reason – it was true.
See also: good, reason

within reason

to the degree that good judgment would allow With a good exercise program, you can eat anything you want, within reason, and not gain weight.
See also: reason, within

no rhyme or reason

also without rhyme or reason
without any reasonable explanation or purpose Because the cave was formed by gases that ate away the rock, there seems to be no rhyme or reason to its shape.
See also: reason, rhyme

no rhyme or reason

if there is no rhyme or reason why something happens, there is no obvious explanation for it I don't know what makes her behave like that. There's no rhyme or reason to it.
See also: reason, rhyme

it stands to reason

if it stands to reason that something happens or is true, it is what you would expect (often + that ) It stands to reason that a child that is constantly criticised will grow up to have no self-confidence.
See also: reason, stand

by reason of

Because of, owing to, as in By reason of a crop failure, the price of coffee is bound to rise. This expression is considered quite formal today. [c. 1300]
See also: of, reason

in reason

Also, within reason. Inside the bounds of good sense, justification, or practicality. For example, We need to keep our prices in reason, or He promised to do what he can to help us, within reason. [Late 1500s]
See also: reason

it stands to reason

It's reasonable or to be expected. For example, It stands to reason that if we leave late we'll arrive late. [Early 1600s]
See also: reason, stand

listen to reason

Pay heed to sensible advice or argument, as in We can't let him rush into that job-it's time he listened to reason. [Mid-1700s]
See also: listen, reason

lose one's mind

Also, lose one's reason. Go crazy, lose one's sanity, as in I thought she'd lost her mind when she said she was going ice-fishing, or That assignment is enough to make me lose my reason. The first expression dates from the late 1500s; the second employs reason in the sense of "unimpaired mental faculties," a usage dating from the late 1300s. Also see under go out of one's mind; have all one's buttons.
See also: lose, mind

rhyme or reason, no

An absence of common sense or reasonableness, as in This memo has no rhyme or reason. Closely related variants are without rhyme or reason, as in The conclusion of her paper was without rhyme or reason, and neither rhyme nor reason, as in Neither rhyme nor reason will explain that lawyer's objections. This term originated in French about 1475 and began to be used in English about a century later. Sir Thomas More is credited with saying of a mediocre book that a friend had put into verse, "Now it is somewhat, for now it is rhyme; whereas before it was neither rhyme nor reason."
See also: rhyme

see reason

Adopt a sensible course of action, let oneself be persuaded, as in At ninety Grandma finally saw reason and gave up driving her car. This expression, which uses reason in the sense of "good sense," was first recorded in Shakespeare's 1 Henry IV (1:2).
See also: reason, see

stand to reason

Be logical or rational, as in It stands to reason that if you don't like hot weather you shouldn't move to Florida. [Early 1600s]
See also: reason, stand

with reason

For a ground or cause, justifiably, as in He turned down their offer, but with reason-he didn't want to move his family to a big city . [c. 1600]
See also: reason

reason out

v.
To determine or conclude something by logical thinking: The detective reasoned out the killer's motive. The mechanics were able to reason out the problem from the little I told them. Rather than worrying about the decision, let's sit down and reason it out.
See also: out, reason

reason with

v.
To attempt to come to an agreement or understanding with someone through logical discussion: The kids did not want to learn to swim, but I reasoned with them until they agreed to take lessons.
See also: reason

no earthly reason

n. no conceivable reason. I can think of no earthly reason why the repairs should cost so much.
See also: earthly, reason

by reason of

Because of.
See also: of, reason

in reason

With good sense or justification; reasonably.
See also: reason

within reason

Within the bounds of good sense or practicality.
See also: reason, within

with reason

With good cause; justifiably.
See also: reason

stand to reason

To be consistent with reason: It stands to reason that if we leave late, we will arrive late.
See also: reason, stand

neither rhyme nor reason

Making no sense at all. “Rhyme” alludes to poetry and by extension all of the creative arts, while “reason” stands for intellect. Accordingly, something that can't be understood or justified in terms of either artistic merit or logic is indeed of little value.
See also: neither, nor, reason, rhyme
References in periodicals archive ?
Recall that Raz reasoned informally that a wide-scope conditional reason claim like (2.
In Mismeasure of Man, Stephen Jay Gould recounts numerous "bad arguments" within the frame of his own carefully reasoned "good" argument, a critique of nineteeth-century craniometry and twentieth-century intelligence testing that makes as explicit as possible the warrants, reservations, and qualifiers.
Others have speculated that panels are reluctant to provide reasoned decisions because that would shed light on the "horse-trading" or "baby-splitting" process that is common behind the closed doors of the three-member, party-appointed panel.
The appellate court in Clarks reasoned that the contingent fee agreement operated as a common law lien on the recovery, thereby vesting in the attorney the right to receive the agreed-on portion of the award.
At first they lived a communal life, but soon reasoned that individual rights produced a more progressive method of survival.
The latter, more distantly related pair, she reasoned, could only contract the same illness through an outside agent, such as a bat.
In one of the most reasoned arguments for academia to resolve the argument over "canon" and what works constitute the proper foundation for an undergraduate curriculum, Graff (1992) warns that the real issue is the failure of students to embrace reading at all:
Efron's conclusions, tightly reasoned and well documented as they are, are merely speculations on the inner workings of Mr.
I wasn't very far into Thomas Clark's crisply written, nicely reasoned, and quite pernicious article, "Humanism and Post, modernism: A Reconciliation" (The Humanist, January/February 1993), before I began muttering to myself, "Somebody's got to respond to this.
It reasoned that Boyd provided free meals for the compensatory reasons of improving morale, attracting employees and as additional compensation.