rear

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Related to reared: reared its head

pain-in-the-rear

(used before a noun) Very irritating, aggravating, or obnoxious. I've still got a few pain-in-the-rear jobs to do around the ranch before I can call it quits for the day. We're having Mary over for dinner tomorrow night. I just hope her pain-in-the-rear husband doesn't come along as well.

pain in the rear

An especially irritating, aggravating, or obnoxious person, thing, or situation. You know, Jack, you may be my friend, but you can be a real pain in the rear sometimes! This calculus homework is a real pain in the rear. It's not that I don't understand it, it's just so tedious!
See also: pain, rear

pain in the ass

rude slang A person or thing that is extremely annoying or inconvenient. I know I need to renew my license, but dealing with the lines at the DMV is such a pain in the ass.
See also: ass, pain

at the rear of

At the back of something. Can you see my father? He's sitting at the rear of the train car. Those boxes should be at the rear of the attic.
See also: of, rear

bring up the rear

To move last in a group of people. You guys go first—I'll bring up the rear. We need one adult to lead the kids, and another to bring up the rear.
See also: bring, rear, up

rear its (ugly) head

Of a difficult, unpleasant problem, to present itself and force people to deal with it. Fundamentalist extremism has been rearing its head all around the world over the last couple years. I can't believe tax day is already rearing its ugly head again.
See also: head, rear

at the rear of something

located at the back part of something. I keep my tools at the rear of my garage. There's a stream at the rear of my property.
See also: of, rear

bring up the rear

to move along behind everyone else; to be at the end of the line. (Originally referred to marching soldiers. Fixed order.) Here comes John, bringing up the rear. Hurry up, Tom! Why are you always bringing up the rear?
See also: bring, rear, up

get off one's ass

 and get off one's rear; get off one's butt
Sl. to get up and get busy; to stop loafing and get to work. (Caution with ass. Butt is also offensive to some people.) Get off your ass and get busy! It's time you got off your butt and started to work.
See also: ass, get, off

in the rear

located in the space or area behind someone or something. The waiter told me that the bathrooms were in the rear. All deliveries must be made in the rear.
See also: rear

pain in the ass

 and a pain in the butt; a pain in the rear
Fig. a very annoying thing or person. (Crude. Potentially offensive. Use only with discretion. An elaboration of pain. Use caution with ass. Butt is less offensive. Rear is euphemistic.) That guy is a real pain in the ass. Things like that give me a pain in the butt.
See also: ass, pain

rear back

 
1. Lit. [for a horse] to pull back and up onto its hind legs in an effort to move backwards rapidly or throw a rider. (See also rear up.) The animal reared back in terror. The horse reared back and almost threw its rider.
2. Fig. [for a person] to pull back and stand up or sit up straighter. He reared back in his chair and looked perturbed. Tom reared back in his chair, waiting for something else to happen.
See also: back, rear

rear its ugly head

Fig. [for something unpleasant] to appear or become obvious after lying hidden. Jealousy reared its ugly head and destroyed their marriage. The question of money always rears its ugly head in matters of business.
See also: head, rear, ugly

rear up

 
1. Lit. [for a horse] to lean back on its hind legs and raise its front legs, assuming a threatening posture or avoiding something on the ground such as a snake. (See also rear back.) The horse reared up suddenly, throwing the rider onto the ground. When the horse reared up, I almost fell off.
2. Fig. [for something, especially a problem] to raise up suddenly. A new problem reared up and cost us a lot of time. A lot of new costs reared up toward the end of the month.
See also: rear, up

bring up the rear

Be last in a line or sequence, as in As a slow walker, I'm used to bringing up the rear, or In test results Tom always brought up the rear. This term almost certainly came from the military but the earliest citation given by the Oxford English Dictionary is from a 1643 religious treatise by Sir Thomas Browne: "My desires onely are . . . to be but the last man, and bring up the Rere in Heaven."
See also: bring, rear, up

rear end

1. The back part of anything, especially a vehicle, as in There's a large dent in the rear end of the car.
2. The buttocks, as in I'm afraid these pants don't fit my rear end. The noun rear alone has been used in both these senses, the first since the late 1700s and the second since the mid-1900s. The addition of end occurred in the first half of the 1900s.
See also: end, rear

rear its ugly head

Appear. This phrase is used only of something undesirable or unpleasant, as in The interview went very well until a question about his academic record reared its ugly head . This expression was first recorded in slightly different form in Anthony Trollope's Barchester Towers (1857): "Rebellion had already reared her hideous head."
See also: head, rear, ugly

rear its head

or

raise its head

COMMON If something unpleasant rears its head or raises its head, it starts to appear or be active, often when it had stopped or been hidden for a period. Now the same ugly forces of racial hatred are beginning to rear their heads again. The familiar pattern of violence is raising its head once again in the region. Note: People often say that something unpleasant rears or raises its ugly head. We will not allow hooliganism to rear its ugly head again.
See also: head, rear

be bringing up the rear

If a person or vehicle is bringing up the rear, they are the last person or vehicle in a moving line of them. There were several police motorcyclists bringing up the rear of the procession. The soldiers followed, Kirov bringing up the rear.
See also: bring, rear, up

rear up

v.
1. To rise on the hind legs, as of a horse: A rattlesnake slithered out from behind the bush, and the horse reared up.
2. To arise or appear suddenly or unexpectedly: We can handle any problems that rear up.
See also: rear, up

get off one’s rear

in. to get up and get busy. (Euphemistic for Get off my ass!) It’s time to get off your rear and get to work.
See also: get, off, rear

kick in the (seat of the) pants

and kick in the ass and kick in the butt and kick in the teeth and kick in the rear
n. a strong message of encouragement or a demand. (Usually objectionable.) All he needs is a kick in the seat of the pants to get him going. A kick in the teeth ought to wake them up and get them moving.
See also: kick, of, pant, seat

kick in the rear

verb
See also: kick, rear

pain in the ass

and pain in the butt and pain in the rear
n. a very annoying thing or person. (Usually objectionable. An elaboration of pain. Rear is euphemistic.) You are a pain in the ass! Things like that give me a pain in the butt.
See also: ass, pain

pain in the rear

verb
See also: pain, rear

rear (end)

n. the tail end; the buttocks. (Euphemistic.) The dog bit her in the rear end.
See also: end, rear

rear

verb

rear-ender

and back-ender
n. an automobile wreck where one car runs into the back of another. (see also fender-bender.) It wasn’t a bad accident, just a rear-ender. The rain caused a couple of “back-enders,” but there were no serious accidents.

bring up the rear

To be the last in a line or sequence.
See also: bring, rear, up
References in classic literature ?
Jones had the satisfaction of seeing an object reared that bore in its outlines, a striking resemblance to a vinegar-cruet.
And Michael, spilling over with unused vitality from the cramped space of the Eugenie's deck, scampered down the beach in a hurly-burly of joy, scenting a thousand intimate land-scents as he ran, and describing a jerky and eccentric course as he made short dashes and good-natured snaps at the coconut crabs that scuttled across his path to the safety of the water or reared up and menaced him with formidable claws and a spluttering and foaming of the shell-lids of their mouths.
A MAN that owned a fine Dog, and by a careful selection of its mate had bred a number of animals but a little lower than the angels, fell in love with his washerwoman, married her, and reared a family of dolts.
But I know your speech well beside my own, for a Trojan nurse brought me up at home: she took me from my dear mother and reared me thenceforth when I was a little child.
The Greeks are interesting and extremely important because they reared such a vast number of great individuals.
WITH THE HELP OF FAVOURABLE MEASURES GREAT INDIVIDUALS MIGHT BE REARED WHO WOULD BE BOTH DIFFERENT FROM AND HIGHER THAN THOSE WHO HERETOFORE HAVE OWED THEIR EXISTENCE TO MERE CHANCE.
Thousands of the elders, of what were then called the New States[*], broke up from the enjoyment of their hard-earned indulgences, and were to be seen leading long files of descendants, born and reared in the forests of Ohio and Kentucky, deeper into the land, in quest of that which might be termed, without the aid of poetry, their natural and more congenial atmosphere.
Though the youngest of their number could not much have passed the period, that, in the nicer judgment of the law, is called the age of discretion, he had proved himself so far worthy of his progenitors as to have reared already his aspiring person to the standard height of his race.
For instance, if reared by conscientious adoptive mothers, female rats born to unresponsive mothers withstand stress and care for newborns just as effectively as do female rats born to dutiful mothers.
In its new study, Meaney's group first found that virgin females who had been reared by attentive mothers more often licked and groomed pups placed in their presence than did virgin females who had been reared by tongues-off mothers.
Rabbinical organizations, particularly alarmed, warn that such unions threaten the Jewish population's continuity because of the chance that children of interfaith couples will not be reared as Jews.