reader


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Related to reader: Reader's Digest

exercise for the reader

A subject, debate, or other matter that is not decided or dealt with directly by the author or presenter, but rather is left up to the judgment or interpretation of the observer, reader, or addressee. The report merely details the spending practices of the parties concerned; whether or not these payments were dubious in nature is left as an exercise for the reader. The politician's speech made broad references to invigorating the economy with practical, no-nonsense measures—what such measures might be, though, was left as an exercise for the reader.
See also: exercise, reader

reader

n. a piece of paper with writing on it; a note; a prescription; an IOU. (Underworld.) I got a reader for some morphine.
References in periodicals archive ?
Automated search features allow online readers to return to topics of interest easily within an issue, and automatic archiving gives readers access to back issues without paper clutter," she said.
It encourages analysis of the relationships of reader to texts and the relationships of texts to culture.
Romance Slam Jam (RSI), which celebrated its 10th anniversary in Dallas earlier this year, is probably the mother of all reader retreats.
Like professional musicians, Eden says, good readers learn a complex skill through nearly lifelong practice.
In contrast, these jarring inconsistencies are extremely noticeable online, especially where a reader may see two clashing Web pages on the same Web site.
The dead-end of her effort and her destruction of her "text" suggest that, despite her role as model for author and reader, her methods do not receive authorial privilege.
The first thing the reader wants to know about your copy is "What's in It for Me?
It is expected that the FINREAD smart card reader initiative will lead to a global standard for secure banking over open networks.
Once we consider the reader, these texts no longer come across as eccentric, if compelling, failures.
The main criteria for providing assistance to the reader were graciousness and cultivation, and the reason for doing so was to make the library a more welcoming institution which then in turn would increase usage and justify the library's existence.
For Allen, reality lies more with the reader than the author.
Teachers can engage the bilingual reader in activities such as sustained silent reading (SSR) or drop everything and read (DEAR).
Moreover, he brings African culture near to the reader by way of the biblical text, presenting outsider culture within a paradigm that sets it at the very heart of the dominant religious tradition of his British and American readers.