read for

read for something

to read, looking especially for something, such as errors, clarity, etc. Please read this manuscript for spelling and grammar errors. Read this book for entertainment and nothing more.
See also: read

read for

v.
1. To study for something, as an examination, degree, or certification: They are in the library reading for their exams next week.
2. To read or examine something in order to look for something specific: I read the text once for comprehension and a second time for pleasure. The writer hired an assistant to read for errors. The tracker read the trail for signs of foxes.
3. To audition for some acting role: Five people read for the part of Hamlet in the school play.
See also: read
References in classic literature ?
As books increased, less and less did people gather to hear others read aloud or tell tales, and more and more people learned to read for themselves, until now there is hardly a boy or girl in all the land who cannot read a little.
Dorothea dared not insist, and she read for an hour or more on the same plan as she had done in the evening, but getting over the pages with more quickness.
Homework counselors help choose suitable books, which lone children read for 15 minutes to the handler-dog team.
Students who do not read for pleasure but only do so when they are completing school assignments is a problem that can affect students' future learning and academic success (Sullivan, 2002).
Her Friday morning group selects single topics to read for an entire year.
They all read for action in the public realm; they all read politically.
A fundamental question obviously is: Do students read for pleasure and, if so, what are they reading?
During the school year, the teacher has worked to increase her students' metacognitive abilities and to encourage her students to read for pleasure.
Medrano's daughter Jennye said that attending the workshops has increased her reading skills and her desire to read for fun.
TM) required that the selected excerpt be more than 1,000 words long and required that all participants read for more than five minutes.
We started requiring that students read for 30 minutes each day,'' Moloznik said.
with the support of MetLife Foundation involved entire communities in motivating young people to read for pleasure.
Library grandparents read for children every weekday afternoon.
Players must complete sentences, read for details and context clues, locate synonyms and antonyms and label parts of speech.
As children learn to read for enjoyment, or to learn about something they are interested in, they tend to read more.