rays


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rays

n. sunshine. (Collegiate.) I’m going to go out and get some rays today.
See also: ray
References in classic literature ?
It was near noon; I knew by the perpendicularity of the sun's rays, which were no longer refracted.
At this depth I could still see the rays of the sun, though feebly; to their intense brilliancy had succeeded a reddish twilight, the lowest state between day and night; but we could still see well enough; it was not necessary to resort to the Ruhmkorff apparatus as yet.
Methought, my sweet one, then I ceased to soar And fell - not swiftly as I rose before, But with a downward, tremulous motion thro' Light, brazen rays, this golden star unto
HIGH on a mountain of enamell'd head - Such as the drowsy shepherd on his bed Of giant pasturage lying at his ease, Raising his heavy eyelid, starts and sees With many a mutter'd "hope to be forgiven" What time the moon is quadrated in Heaven - Of rosy head, that towering far away Into the sunlit ether, caught the ray Of sunken suns at eve - at noon of night, While the moon danc'd with the fair stranger light - Uprear'd upon such height arose a pile Of gorgeous columns on th' unburthen'd air, Flashing from Parian marble that twin smile Far down upon the wave that sparkled there, And nursled the young mountain in its lair.
The poor young couple were in despair, and only parted with the last ray of sunshine, and in hopes of meeting next morning.
Because, though we are floating in space, our projectile, bathed in the solar rays, will receive light and heat.
Indeed, under these rays which no atmosphere can temper, either in temperature or brilliancy, the projectile grew warm and bright, as if it had passed suddenly from winter to summer.
The thick window inserted in the bottom could bear any amount of weight, and Barbicane and his companions walked upon it as if it were solid plank; but the sun striking it directly with its rays lit the interior of the projectile from beneath, thus producing singular effects of light.
At half-past four that afternoon Ray was puttering about the barnyard when his wife came up the lane along the creek and called him.
The whole world seemed to Ray Pearson to have become alive with something just as he and Hal had suddenly become alive when they stood in the corn field stating into each other's eyes.
The beauty of the country about Winesburg was too much for Ray on that fall evening.
I'm jealous sometimes, too," confessed Sara Ray, "and so my first resolution will be 'I shall try not to feel jealous when I hear the other girls in school describing all the sick spells they've had.
I wish I could resolve that, too," sighed Sara Ray, "but it wouldn't be any use.
Suddenly a bell thrills; the engineers run to the turbine-valves and stand by; but the spectacled slave of the Ray in the U-tube never lifts his head.
My mate's arm's broke; my engineer's head's cut open; my Ray went out when the engines smashed; and