ray


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get some rays

To spend some time in the sun (often with goal of tanning). We're supposed to have nice weather this afternoon, so why don't we go to the beach and get some rays? I'm really glad I got some rays on vacation—I was so pale before!
See also: get, ray

grab some rays

To spend some time in the sun (often with goal of tanning). We're supposed to have nice weather this afternoon, so why don't we go to the beach and grab some rays? I'm really glad I grabbed some rays on vacation—I was so pale before!
See also: grab, ray

ray of sunshine

Someone or something that makes others feel happy and positive, often during a difficult time. My best friend was a real ray of sunshine when I was recovering from surgery.
See also: of, ray, sunshine

ray of light

1. Literally, a beam of light. A ray of light warmed my face through the window. How can you read in here? There's hardly a single ray of light!
2. Someone or something that brings one joy and/or hope, especially in a challenging situation. My daughter has been a real ray of light these days—I'm so glad to have her here as I fight this illness. After we moved, we got a puppy, which has been such a ray of light for the kids as they adjust to life in a new place.
See also: light, of, ray

catch some rays

 and bag some rays
Fig. to get some sunshine; to tan in the sun. We wanted to catch some rays, but the sun never came out the whole time we were there. I went to Hawaii to bag some rays.
See also: catch, ray

a ray of sunshine

someone or something that makes you feel hopeful The company's earnings provided a ray of sunshine for investors on Friday. Sara's visit was a ray of sunshine in her grandmother's day.
See also: of, ray, sunshine

catch some rays

(slang) also catch a few rays
to lie or sit outside in the sun This summer, there are plenty of festivals and outdoor concerts where you can catch some rays while enjoying the music.
See also: catch, ray

catch some rays

  (informal) also catch a few rays (informal)
to lie or sit outside in the sun I thought I'd take my lunch outside and catch a few rays.
See also: catch, ray

a ray of sunshine

someone or something that makes you feel happy, especially in a difficult situation Amid all the gloom, their grandchild has been a real ray of sunshine.
See also: of, ray, sunshine

catch some rays

Sunbathe, as in I want a good tan so I think I'll go catch some rays. [Slang; second half of 1900s]
See also: catch, ray

catch some rays

and bag some rays
tv. to get some sunshine; to tan in the sun. We wanted to catch some rays, but the sun never came out the whole time we were there. I want to get out on that beach and bag some rays.
See also: catch, ray

bag some rays

verb
See also: bag, ray

rays

n. sunshine. (Collegiate.) I’m going to go out and get some rays today.
See also: ray
References in classic literature ?
And you can watch my Ray, For I must go away And dance with Ella Sweyn at Elsinore!
At this depth I could still see the rays of the sun, though feebly; to their intense brilliancy had succeeded a reddish twilight, the lowest state between day and night; but we could still see well enough; it was not necessary to resort to the Ruhmkorff apparatus as yet.
Because, though we are floating in space, our projectile, bathed in the solar rays, will receive light and heat.
Indeed, under these rays which no atmosphere can temper, either in temperature or brilliancy, the projectile grew warm and bright, as if it had passed suddenly from winter to summer.
The thick window inserted in the bottom could bear any amount of weight, and Barbicane and his companions walked upon it as if it were solid plank; but the sun striking it directly with its rays lit the interior of the projectile from beneath, thus producing singular effects of light.
When Ray and Barbara founded the company four decades ago, Ray was employed as a Factory worker in the Indianapolis area and worked part-time at the newly formed family business, which focused on trash hauling.
Rachael Ray 30-Minute Meals for Kids'' (Lake Isle Press Inc.
Detectors on the exit side of the patient record the x rays exiting the section of the patient's body being irradiated as an x-ray "snapshot" at one position (angle) of the source of x rays.
At 37, Ray, a self-described "nature girl" who lives in rural Georgia, cares little for the cachet of coolness.
Instead Ray reckoned that any one artwork could do all these things - and do them simultaneously.
How was it that ozone, which Ray described in 1990 as "possibly the most damaging of all air pollutants derived from human activity," was changed into the minor irritant that Ray spoke of three years later?
the electron beam voltage, knowing the angle between the electron beam and the sample (takeoff angle), collecting the emitted x rays from the sample, comparing the emitted x-ray flux to known standards (to determine the k-ratio) and transformation of the k-ratio to concentration using algorithms which includes, as a minimum, the atomic number, absorption, and fluorescence corrections.
From the mid-1950s until his death in 1992, Ray chronicled the Bengali experience in the most down-to-earth, humanistic manner.
X-ray images taken a decade ago showed that shock waves from supernova remnants can accelerate electrons to cosmic ray energies, but electrons make up only about 10 percent of cosmic rays.
Marcia Hollister Ray, a Glendale resident for 55 years, died at her home there Saturday.