rare old time

rare old time

n. a fine and enjoyable time at a party or something similar. (Folksy.) That was a rare old time at Tom’s the other night.
See also: old, rare, time
References in periodicals archive ?
Stand at the bar having a rare old time until eventually the realisation dawns on me it's Dave's birthday tomorrow and I have to get back early.
MUSIC for a rare old time - that's the speciality of Warwickshire line- up The Oddsods.
He arrives with his sister and wife and they have a rare old time together.
We had a rare old time, apart from calling them all by their Street names.
MUSIC for a rare old time returns to Brinklow next week with the new Oddsods line-up.
In the vastly overrated Sixties, a few square miles of London had a rare old time while the rest of the country still believed that Saturday night was for checking your football pools coupon.
I had a rare old time myself and particularly enjoyed my stop-off in the Ritz Cafe.
And if you're in Brinklow tonight, why not say hello at the British Legion on Heath Lane where my own band, The Oddsods will be onstage for a rare old time of mainly Irish songs and music.
He was having a rare old time, when suddenly he broke off and wandered quietly through to the bathroom.
They were having a rare old time, all millionaires together celebrating the luck that had transformed their lives at a stroke.
With not a money worry in the world, Mandy and her pals were having a rare old time to themselves at the Headfast Equestrian Dinner at the Hilton Hotel in Glasgow.
We planned to photograph him with team mate Mark Hateley having a rare old time in Monaco's famous casino and in their plush apartments.
Amidst all the jollity and culinary capers, Loyd has more trouble than usual keeping a lid on studio frivolity as the celebrity chefs and judges have a rare old time in their role reversals.
Furthermore she is self-supporting - and I am not just talking about her bra - doesn't give a damn about what anyone says about her and has a rare old time with her joy boys.