rank

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Related to ranks: Military ranks

close ranks

to move closer together in a military formation. The soldiers closed ranks and marched on the enemy in tight formation.
See also: close, rank

close ranks

(behind someone or something) to support someone or something; to back someone or something. We will close ranks behind the party's nominee. Let's close ranks behind her and give her the support she needs.
See also: close, rank

close ranks (with someone)

to join with someone in a cause, or agreement. We can fight this menace only if we close ranks. Let's all close ranks with Ann and adopt her suggestions.
See also: close, rank

come up through the ranks

Fig. to rise to a position of leadership by working up through the sequence of lower positions. He came up through the ranks to become a corporate executive. The general came up through the ranks. There is no other way to become a general.
See also: come, rank, up

pull rank (on someone)

Fig. to assert one's rank, authority, or position over someone when making a request or giving an order. Don't pull rank on me! I don't have to do what you say! When she couldn't get her way politely, she pulled rank and really got some action.
See also: pull, rank

rank above someone

to outrank someone; to rank higher than someone. I think that I rank above you, so I will sit by the window. The boss ranks above everyone and demands that everyone recognize the fact.
See also: above, rank

rank among something

to be included in a particular group. In my opinion, Kelly ranks among the very best. Tom ranks among the most widely known of the contemporary writers.
See also: among, rank

rank and file

 
1. Lit. regular soldiers, not the officers. I think there is low morale among the rank and file, sir. The rank and file usually do exactly as they are told.
2. Fig. the ordinary members of a group, not the leaders. The rank and file will vote on the proposed contract tomorrow. The last contract was turned down by the rank and file last year.
See also: and, file, rank

rank as something

to have a particular rank; to serve in a particular rank. She ranks as a fine pianist in my book. Don ranks as the top economist of the day.
See also: rank

rank on someone

Sl. to attack someone verbally; to gossip about someone. Please stop ranking on my family! Tom keeps ranking on Jennifer, and she is really mad about it.
See also: on, rank

rank someone among something

to judge someone to be essentially equal to a specific group of people. I don't rank Kelly among the best drivers in the world. Our committee ranked Fred among the best of the current applicants.
See also: among, rank

rank someone or something as something

to assign a particular rank to someone or something. I have to rank Sally as number one. She's the best. Mary ranked the chocolate as the best she had ever eaten.
See also: rank

rank someone (out)

 
1. Sl. to annoy someone. He really ranks me out. What a pest!
2. Sl. to chastise someone. She ranked him out for being a coward. I ranked out the whole gang, but good!

rank someone with someone

to judge someone to be equal with someone. Would you rank Tom with Donna? Fred ranked himself with Tom when it came to diving.
See also: rank

rank with someone or something

to be equal to someone or something. Do you think Sarah ranks with Albert? No one ranks with Albert. The food at that restaurant ranks with that of the best places in New York.
See also: rank

rise from the ranks

Fig. to achieve position or office, having worked up from the masses. He rose from the ranks to become president of the company. Most of the officers of the company have risen from the ranks.
See also: rank, rise

pull rank

to use the power of your job or position to make someone do what you want Some of the seniors in our school pull rank on the younger kids and force them to run errands for them.
See also: pull, rank

break ranks

to do or say something different from what a group you belong to does or says Two owners broke ranks and said they were against locking out the players.
Usage notes: often followed by with: They decided to break ranks with the alliance and work independently for a solution.
Etymology: based on the military meaning of break ranks (to walk away from a straight row in which you and other soldiers have been standing)
See also: break, rank

close ranks

to show support for other members of your group Dale urged his former rivals to close ranks behind his candidacy.
Etymology: based on the military meaning of close ranks (to form a straight row with other soldiers)
See also: close, rank

join the ranks of something

to become part of a larger group or organization Their country will join the ranks of the most developed nations of the world in four or five years.
See also: join, of, rank

break ranks

to publicly show that you disagree with a group of which you are a member (often + with ) Junior officers were said to be prepared to break ranks with the leadership.
See also: break, rank

close ranks

if members of a group close ranks, they publicly show that they support each other, especially when people outside of the group are criticizing them
Usage notes: If soldiers close ranks, they move closer together so that it is more difficult to go past them.
In the past, the party would have closed ranks around its leader and defended him loyally against his critics.
See also: close, rank

join the ranks of something

to become part of a large group Thousands of young people join the ranks of the unemployed each summer when they leave school.
See Join the club!, enter the fray
See also: join, of, rank

pull rank

to use the power that your position gives you over someone in order to make them do what you want (often + on ) He doesn't have the authority to pull rank on me any more. She was boss of forty or more people but, to her credit, she never once pulled rank.
See also: pull, rank

the rank and file

the ordinary members of an organization and not its leaders The party leadership seems to be losing the support of the rank and file.
See pull rank
See also: and, file, rank

break ranks

Fall out of line or into disorder; also, fail to conform, deviate. For example, The recruits were warned that they must not break ranks, or Harry was told to adhere to the party platform and not break ranks. This idiom uses rank in the sense of "soldiers drawn up in line," and the term originally referred to their falling into disarray. The figurative usage dates from the mid-1800s.
See also: break, rank

close ranks

Unite, work together, as in The members decided to close ranks and confront the president. This expression, dating from the late 1700s, comes from the military, where it denotes bringing troops into close order so there are no gaps in the fighting line. (A slightly earlier form was close lines.) It has been used figuratively since the mid-1800s.
See also: close, rank

pull rank

Use one's higher status to compel obedience or obtain privileges, as in She hated pulling rank in the office, but sometimes it was necessary. This term comes from the military. [c. 1920]
See also: pull, rank

rank and file

Followers, the general membership, as in This new senator really appeals to the rank and file in the labor unions. This expression comes from the military, where a rank denotes soldiers standing side by side in a row, and file refers to soldiers standing behind one another. The first recorded figurative use of this term was in 1860.
See also: and, file, rank

rise through the ranks

Also, rise from the ranks; come up through the ranks. Work one's way to the top, as in He's risen through the ranks, starting as a copyboy and ending up as senior editor. Originally this term was used for an officer who had worked his way up from the rank of private, a rare feat. It was being applied to nonmilitary advances by the mid-1800s. Also see come up, def. 4.
See also: rank, rise

rank

tv. to give someone a hard time; to hassle someone. (Possible from pull rank = use rank to dominate someone.) Stop ranking me!

rank and file

n. the common members of something. What will the rank and file think of the proposal?
See also: and, file, rank

rank on someone

in. to attack someone verbally; to gossip about someone. (see also rank.) Please stop ranking on my family!
See also: on, rank

rank someone (out)

tv. to annoy or chastise someone. (see also rank.) He really ranks me out. What a pest!
See also: out, rank

rank someone

verb
See also: rank
References in classic literature ?
There was among the ranks of the Disinherited Knight a champion in black armour, mounted on a black horse, large of size, tall, and to all appearance powerful and strong, like the rider by whom he was mounted, This knight, who bore on his shield no device of any kind, had hitherto evinced very little interest in the event of the fight, beating off with seeming case those combatants who attacked him, but neither pursuing his advantages, nor himself assailing any one.
Suddenly a man sprang out of the English ranks, fell upon Athos, twined arms of steel around him, and tearing his sword from him, said in his ear:
His armour is laid upon the ground, and he stalks in front of the ranks as it were some great woolly ram ordering his ewes.
It may gratify the pride of aristocracy to reflect that disease, more than any other circumstance of human life, pays due observance to the distinctions which rank and wealth, and poverty and lowliness, have established among mankind.
They were down wind from Tarzan, and so their scent was not carried to him, and as his back was turned half toward them he did not see their cautious advance over the edge of the promontory and down through the rank grass toward the sandy beach where he lay.
Not a rifleman in those crouching ranks, not a cannoneer at those masked and shotted guns, but knows the needs of the situation, the imperative duty of forbearance.
The Nome King had left his throne and pressed through his warriors to the front ranks, so he could see what was going on; but as he faced Ozma and her friends the Scarecrow, as if aroused to action by the valor of the private, drew one of Billina's eggs from his right jacket pocket and hurled it straight at the little monarch's head.
The rank, wealth, and eminent character of the deceased must have insured the strictest scrutiny into every ambiguous circumstance.
Sandy, which is the highest rank, patriarch or prophet?
You were always in the front rank, and I was always behind.
Yonder group Of scarlet peonies hath ringed about A lordly fellow with ten witnesses Of his official rank.
Military rank under the crown of Great Britain was attained with much longer probation, and by much more toilsome services, sixty years ago than at the present time.
But now in this government of Plato's there are no traces of a monarchy, only of an oligarchy and democracy; though he seems to choose that it should rather incline to an oligarchy, as is evident from the appointment of the magistrates; for to choose them by lot is common to both; but that a man of fortune must necessarily be a member of the assembly, or to elect the magistrates, or take part in the management of public affairs, while others are passed over, makes the state incline to an oligarchy; as does the endeavouring that the greater part of the rich may be in office, and that the rank of their appointments may correspond with their fortunes.
If I had been a young lady in your own rank of life," she went on, "I might have thanked you for paying me a compliment, and have given you a serious answer.
A true knowledge of the world is gained only by conversation, and the manners of every rank must be seen in order to be known.