rage

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air rage

Sudden, unruly, and often violently aggressive behavior of a passenger aboard an airplane, generally while in the air, which puts the safety of other passengers, the crew, or the airplane at risk. The term is modeled on "road rage," which is the equivalent behavior in relation to driving. Airline crews are trained to diffuse incidents of air rage, which often start as minor disputes between passengers.
See also: air, rage

in a rage

Furious; very angry. I'd steer clear of dad right now—he's in a rage because of some problem at work. I can't stand sitting in traffic, it totally gets me in a rage.
See also: rage

all the rage

Fig. in current fashion; being a current fad. A new dance called the "floppy disc" is all the rage. Wearing a rope instead of a belt was all the rage in those days.
See also: all, rage

bristle with rage

 and bristle with anger; bristle with indignation
Fig. to demonstrate one's anger, rage, or displeasure with a strong negative response. (Alludes to a dog or cat raising the hair on its back in anger or as a threat.) She was just bristling with anger. I don't know what set her off. Walter bristled with rage as he saw the damage to his new car.
See also: bristle, rage

fly into a rage

Fig. to become enraged suddenly. When he heard the report, he flew into a rage. We were afraid that she would fly into a rage.
See also: fly, rage

rage against someone or something

to vent one's anger about someone or something; to criticize someone or something severely. She exhausted herself raging against Judy. Mary is raging about the office politics again.
See also: rage

rage at someone or something

to direct one's anger at someone or something. Why are you raging at me? What on earth did I do? Nothing can be solved by raging at the police department.
See also: rage

rage out of control

to become uncontrollable. The fire raged out of control and threatened the residential area. If we didn't do something quickly, the fire would be raging out of control.
See also: control, of, out, rage

rage over someone or something

to fight furiously over someone or something. The two managers both wanted to hire the same prospective employee. They raged over her for nearly an hour. The bean raged over that one fish for a long time.
See also: rage

rage through something

 
1. Lit. [for a fire] to burn rapidly through an area or a building. The fire raged through the unoccupied building. When the fire began to rage through the forest, we knew we had better head for the river.
2. Fig. [for someone] to move rapidly through some sequence or process, as if in a rage. Harry raged through the contract, looking for more errors. She raged through the book, angry with everything she read.
See also: rage

all the rage

also the latest rage
very fashionable or stylish DVDs are all the rage, and several movie companies have started releasing titles in this format. Flared slacks and low heels are the latest rage in women's fashion.
See also: all, rage

fly into a rage

See: fly off the handle
See also: fly, rage

be all the rage

  (old-fashioned, informal)
to be very fashionable Fake leopard print, so fashionable in the seventies, is all the rage again now.
See also: all, rage

all the rage

Also, all the thing. The current or latest fashion, with the implication that it will be short-lived, as in In the 1940s the lindy-hop was all the rage. The use of rage reflects the transfer of an angry passion to an enthusiastic one; thing is vaguer. [Late 1700s] These terms are heard less often today than the synonym the thing.
See also: all, rage

rage against

v.
To protest something angrily or violently: The marching protestors were raging against the new taxes.
See also: rage

rage at

v.
To express or direct strong anger toward someone or something: The sergeant raged at the troops for falling behind the rest of the platoon.
See also: rage

the rage

n. the current fad; an irresistible fad. (Often with all the. Old but recurrent.) One rage after another. Can’t I find something that will stay the same for a while?
See also: rage

rage

in. to party; to celebrate. (Collegiate.) Fred and Mary were raging over at the frat house last weekend.
References in classic literature ?
For Joe, while the battle raged, she would have done anything.
The storm still raged, and various were the noises, more terrific even than the wind, which struck at intervals on her startled ear.
As we passed at a dizzy height over the narrow domains of the therns the flash of powder far below bore mute witness to the ferocity of the battle that still raged along that cruel frontier.
All hands had taken their spell at everything as the fancy seized them; not a bell had been struck from first to last; and I can only conjecture that the fire raged four or five hours, from the fact that it was midnight by my watch when I left it on my cabin drawers, and that the final extinction of the smouldering keel was so soon followed by the first deep hint of dawn.
The tempest which had raged within him ever since the instant when he had lost the hope and the will to save the gypsy,--that tempest had not left in his conscience a single healthy idea, a single thought which maintained its upright position.
As the pursued and the pursuer raced madly toward the distant forest the battle behind them raged with bloody savageness.
For another hour the battle raged nor did it cease until the last of the Abyssinians lay dead upon the ground, or had galloped off toward the north in flight.
But though these passions ordinarily succeed each other, and scarce twenty-four hours ever passed in which the pedagogue was not, in some degree, the object of both; yet, on extraordinary occasions, when the passion of anger had raged very high, the remission was usually longer: and so was the case at present; for she continued longer in a state of affability, after this fit of jealousy was ended, than her husband had ever known before: and, had it not been for some little exercises, which all the followers of Xantippe are obliged to perform daily, Mr Partridge would have enjoyed a perfect serenity of several months.
He raged through the camp, smelling and digging in every likely place, snarling so frightfully that Pike heard and shivered in his hiding-place.
Do they think the roads will be safer if all the raged drivers are doped up on anti-depressants?