raffle off

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raffle something off

to give something away by a drawing or raffle. They will raffle a television set off. They are going to raffle off a television set this weekend at the school.
See also: off

raffle off

v.
To offer something as a prize in a lottery in which a number of persons buy chances to win: The theater is raffling off tickets to its upcoming plays. The school raffled a new car off to raise money for a new swimming pool.
See also: off
References in classic literature ?
Don't put it into words, Raffles, or I'll get up and go.
You mustn't do that before the coffee and liqueur," said Raffles laughing.
In answer to your first question - Lord Lochmaben," replied Raffles, blowing bracelets of smoke toward the ceiling.
Carruthers; without a doubt these Lochmabens would use it for the same purpose; and in the altered circumstances I had no hesitation in giving Raffles all the information he desired.
But Raffles had reminded himself by his movement with the flask that it had become dangerously loose from its leather covering, and catching sight of a folded paper which had fallen within the fender, he took it up and shoved it under the leather so as to make the glass firm.
By that time Rigg came forward with a brandy-bottle, filled the flask, and handed Raffles a sovereign, neither looking at him nor speaking to him.
said Raffles, turning back his head as he opened the door.
Raffles, walking with the uneasy gait of a town loiterer obliged to do a bit of country journeying on foot, looked as incongruous amid this moist rural quiet and industry as if he had been a baboon escaped from a menagerie.
I complimented Raffles on the mere composition of his telegram, with half the characteristics of my distinguished kinsman squeezed into a dozen odd words; and let him know how the old ruffian had really treated me.
But Raffles had characteristic methods of minimizing even that danger, of which something anon; meanwhile he recounted more than one of his nocturnal adventures, all, however, of a singularly innocent type; and one thing I noticed while he talked.
But he did not refuse my stall for the Lyceum, which Raffles would not allow me to use myself, and presented to him off-hand without my leave.
Instead of going downstairs, Raffles led me up two flights, and so out upon a perfectly flat roof.
And at that Raffles stood still, with raised eyebrows and stern eyes that I could meet the better now that he knew the worst; then, with a shrug, he resumed his walk, and for some minutes neither of us spoke.
Nor was this simply because Raffles had the subtle power of making himself irresistible at will.
I'll do anything in this world for you, Raffles," I said, "if you really mean that you won't give me away.