radiate from

radiate from someone or something

to spread out from someone or something, as with rays. Happiness radiated from Mary. She was so proud! The heat radiated from the wall next to the furnace room.
References in classic literature ?
Five of these great thoroughfares radiate from one ample centre--a centre which is exceedingly well adapted to the accommodation of heavy artillery.
Her narrow, humdrum existence bloomed under the dews that fell from this fresh spirit; her dullness brightened under the kindling touch of the younger mind, took fire from the "vital spark of heavenly flame" that seemed always to radiate from Rebecca's presence.
When warmth began to radiate from the stove, and the first ray of sunlight lay on the kitchen floor, Ethan's dark thoughts melted in the mellower air.
A delicious atmosphere of health, freshness, and good humor seemed to radiate from her wherever she went and whatever she did.
That intense blast forces the surface of the metal to form nanostructures and microstructures that dramatically alter how efficiently can radiate from the filament.
Long, thin filaments radiate from the umbra into a brighter surrounding region called the penumbra.
Sweat does not evaporate as fast when the relative humidity is high and heat does not radiate from the skin quickly when there is too little gradient between skin temperature and air temperature.
Five pairs of double beams radiate from the southern (upper) edge of the park in a way variously compared by Hecker to the fingers of a hand or the leaves of an open book.
In another group, the circles radiate from the center like ripples around a droplet falling into liquid, but the tone of these pictures is low and throaty, muffled and monotonic, like the lowest keys of a piano.