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Related to racker: racked, raker, cracker

meat rack

A typically public place where one goes to find potential sexual partners. Primarily heard in US. Our student bar is the college's meat rack on the weekends. It seems like everyone I know has hooked up with at least one person there. Everyone knows that the clubs on Leeson Street are just meat racks for single people.
See also: meat, rack

rack off

Get out of here; go away; get lost. Primarily heard in Australia. Listen, I don't want to buy any, so why don't you just rack off and leave me alone! Rack off, Jerry! I'm sick of your foolishness.
See also: off, rack

go to rack and ruin

 and go to wrack and ruin
to become ruined. (The words rack and wrack mean "wreckage" and are found only in this expression.) That lovely old house on the corner is going to go to rack and ruin. My lawn is going to wrack and ruin.
See also: and, rack, ruin

rack one's brain(s)

Fig. to try very hard to think of something. I racked my brains all afternoon, but couldn't remember where I put the book. Don't waste any more time racking your brain. Go borrow the book from the library.
See also: brain, rack

rack out

Sl. to go to bed and to sleep. I'm really tired. I've got to go rack out for a while. I racked out until nearly noon.
See also: out, rack

rack something up

 
1. Lit. to place something onto or into its rack. You had better rack the billiard balls up when you finish this game. Please rack up the balls.
2. Fig. to accumulate something; to collect or acquire something. They all racked a lot of profits up. We racked up twenty points in the game last Saturday.
3. Sl. to wreck or damage something. Fred racked his new car up. He racked up his arm in the football game.
See also: rack, up

racked with pain

suffering from severe pain. My body was racked with pain, and I nearly passed out. My head was racked with pain.
See also: pain, rack

rack your brains

also rack your brain
to try very hard to remember or think of something She racked her brains for a subject they could discuss without an argument.
See also: brain, rack

off the rack

1. from among the goods available in stores We are requiring contestants to buy their outfits off the rack and banning custom-made costumes.
2. at the usual price Members can get discounts of up to 50 percent on the hotels' off-the-rack rates.
See also: off, rack

rack up something

also rack something up
1. to obtain a large amount of something We racked up a lot of miles on our last vacation. Laura is starting to rack the money up now.
2. to score a large number of points Even though Miller racked up 28 points, the team still lost.
See also: rack, up

on the rack

anxious, often because you are waiting for something or because people are asking you difficult questions You're left on the rack for three days waiting for the results from the hospital. Here was a respected politician being put on the rack (= asked a lot of difficult questions) by aggressive junior politicians.
See also: on, rack

rack your brain/brains

to think very hard, usually in order to remember something or to find a solution to a problem I've been racking my brains but I still can't remember who wrote that play.
See go to rack and ruin
See also: brain, rack

go to rack/wrack and ruin

  (old-fashioned)
if a building goes to rack and ruin, its condition becomes very bad because no one is taking care of it She's let that house go to rack and ruin since Clive died.
See also: and, rack, ruin

off the rack

Ready-made, as in She has all her clothes made; she never buys a dress off the rack. The rack here is a frame from which clothes are hung. [Mid-1900s] A British synonym is off the peg, similarly alluding to a knob from which clothes are hung and dating from the late 1800s. Also see off the shelf.
See also: off, rack

on the rack

Under great stress, as in I was on the rack while I waited for the test results. This expression, alluding to a medieval instrument of torture to which the victim was fastened and stretched, has been used figuratively since the late 1500s. Shakespeare had it in The Merchant of Venice (3:2): "Let me choose, for as I am I live upon the rack."
See also: on, rack

rack and ruin, go to

Also, go to wrack and ruin. Become decayed, decline or fall apart, as in After the founder's death the business went to rack and ruin. These expressions are emphatic redundancies, since rack and wrack (which are actually variants of the same word) mean "destruction" or "ruin." [Mid-1500s]
See also: and, rack

rack one's brain

Also, cudgel one's brains. Strain to remember or find a solution, as in I've been racking my brain trying to recall where we put the key, or He's been cudgeling his brains all day over this problem. The first term, first recorded in 1583 as rack one's wit, alludes to the rack that is an instrument of torture, on which the victim's body was stretched until the joints were broken. The variant, from the same period, uses cudgel in the sense of "beat with a cudgel" (a short thick stick). Shakespeare used it in Hamlet (5:1): "Cudgel thy brains no more about it, for your dull ass will not bend his pace with beating." Also see beat one's brains out.
See also: brain, rack

rack out

Go to sleep, as in I racked out about midnight. This slangy expression, as well as the related rack time, for sleeping or snooze time, use rack to refer to being laid out on a framework, here a bed.
See also: out, rack

rack up

Accumulate or score, as in Last night's episode of that new sitcom racked up at least fifteen points in the ratings. [Colloquial; mid-1900s]
See also: rack, up

rack up

v.
1. To accumulate or score a number of something: The home team racked up 64 points. Our team did badly in the first half, but in the second half we really racked the points up.
2. To set up billiard balls for a game of billiards or pool by placing them in the rack: He racked up the balls at the start of the game. She picked up the balls, racked them up, and cued off.
See also: rack, up

crack-rack

n. a extra seat on a motorcycle, behind the driver. (see also pussy-pad.) Get on the crack-rack, and I’ll give you a ride.

rack

1. n. a bed. You don’t get to see the rack very much in the army.
2. Go to rack (out).
3. n. a pair of [female] breasts. (Usually objectionable.) Look at the rack on that dame! How can she stand upright?

rack face

n. one’s face after sleeping in a bed or rack. In the mirror, I saw an old man with “rack face” and a scraggly beard.
See also: face, rack

rack (out)

in. to go to sleep or to bed. (see also rack.) What time do you rack out?
See also: out, rack

rack

verb

rack something up

1. tv. to accumulate something; to collect or acquire something. We racked up twenty points in the game last Saturday.
2. tv. to wreck something. He racked up his arm in the football game.
See also: rack, up

rack time

and rack duty
n. time spent in bed. (Military.) Gee, I need some more rack time. I was on rack duty for my entire leave.
See also: rack, time

rack duty

verb
See also: duty, rack

rack up

in. to become alcohol intoxicated. (see also racked (up).) Let’s go down to the tavern and rack up.
See also: rack, up

racked

mod. struck in the testicles. (Usually objectionable.) The quarterback got racked and didn’t play the rest of the quarter.
See also: rack

racked (up)

mod. alcohol or drug intoxicated. (see also rack up.) They drank till they were good and racked.
See also: rack, up

racked

verb
See also: rack

rack (one's) brain

Informal
To think long and hard: I racked my brain for hours trying to recall her name.
See also: brain, rack

off the rack

Ready-made. Used of clothing.
See also: off, rack

on the rack

Under great stress.
See also: on, rack

rack (one's) brains

/brain
To try hard to remember or think of something.
See also: brain, rack

rack and ruin

Completely destroyed. “Rack” is a variant of “wrack,” meaning “wreck.” Accordingly, something (or someone) that has gone to rack and ruin is totally devastated.
See also: and, rack, ruin
References in periodicals archive ?
Racker served as WACVB's secretary treasurer prior to his appointment as president, and he knows each member organization well.
Five years ago, Utah County made the decision to privatize tourism for the area and hired Racker to head up the program.
We pride ourselves on a collaborative culture at Rackspace, so this honor is a larger acknowledgement of the hard work, growth and success of all Rackers," said Napier.
For example, Rackers in 2005 attempted 14 field goals from between 40 and 49 yards.
ALL FALL DOWN: American Kenny Rackers, right, celebrates winning the first race at Cooper's Hill during the annual Bank Holiday tradition of cheese-rolling in Gloucestershire
Kenny Rackers travelled more than 4,000 miles from Colorado to a steep hill in Gloucestershire to take part in the worldfamous event.
In addition, Rackers are excited about where the business is going (86%, placing Rackspace seventh).
All Rackers from frontline support techs to senior leaders--work in cubicles.
That is after Washington cut Neil Rackers, apparently giving the job to Graham Gano - for half a day.
In Germany, companies like Rackers and BBL have opted for the non-electric Aquence technology from Henkel, a sustainable coating process that additionally does completely without hazardous heavy metals.
P Ben Graham (left groin), CB Bryant McFadden (chest), K Neil Rackers (right groin), CB Dominique Rodgers-Cromartie (toe,knee), S Antrel Rolle (thigh)
The pressure finally told in the 32nd minute, though, when Jeroen Hertzberger scored from the left flank off a measured pass from Rob Rackers.
The Jungle, a book by one of those muck rackers, Upton Sinclair, published in 1906, was behind Theodore Roosevelt's successful push for the Meat Inspection Act.
Also, the Cardinals' Neil Rackers, who had made all 31 of his previous attempts this season - including six from at least 50 yards - missed from 43 yards.