quite


Also found in: Dictionary, Thesaurus, Wikipedia.

have a pair

vulgar slang To act or behave in a strong, confident, and/or courageous manner. Though short for "have a pair of testicles/balls" (discretion should be used because of this), the phrase can be said by or of either a male or female. Often used with an intensifier, such as "quite a pair" or "a big pair." Primarily heard in US. Crime is really bad in this town, so you've got to have a big pair to be a police officer around here. Wow, your sister must have quite a pair to stand up to her boss like that!
See also: have, pair

be quite something

To be particularly noteworthy, remarkable, interesting, special, or impressive. Wow, this new car of yours is quite something! A: "I hope we get a chance to meet the band after the concert." B: "Yeah, now that would be quite something!"
See also: quite

be in a sticky situation

To be in the midst of or dealing with a particularly awkward, embarrassing, precarious, or difficult situation or circumstance. I knew I was in a sticky situation when the boss saw me kissing his daughter at the movies. I'll be in quite a sticky situation if I arrive at the train station and don't have enough money for the tickets!
See also: situation, sticky

in a sticky situation

In the midst of a particularly awkward, embarrassing, precarious, or difficult situation or circumstance. I found myself in a bit of a sticky situation when the boss saw me kissing his daughter at the movies. I'll be in quite a sticky situation if I arrive at the train station and don't have enough money for the tickets!
See also: situation, sticky

batting on a sticky wicket

In the midst of or dealing with a particularly awkward or difficult situation or circumstance. Refers to the pitch, called a "wicket," used in the game of cricket and the difficulty of playing on one after it has been wetted with rain. Primarily heard in UK, Australia. I found myself batting on a sticky wicket when the boss saw me kissing his daughter at the cinema. I'll be batting on a sticky wicket if I arrive at the train station and don't have enough money for the tickets!
See also: batting, on, sticky, wicket

on a sticky wicket

In the midst of or dealing with a particularly awkward or difficult situation or circumstance. (Refers to the pitch, called a "wicket," used in the game of cricket and the difficulty of playing on one after it has been wetted with rain.) Primarily heard in UK, Australia. I found myself on a bit of a sticky wicket when the boss saw me kissing his daughter at the cinema. I'll be batting on a sticky wicket if I arrive at the train station and don't have enough money for the tickets!
See also: on, sticky, wicket

feel for

A better sense of (a situation or how to do something); a greater knowledge or experience in (something). Once I got a feel for the company's daily operations, I felt more comfortable taking on the management role.
See also: feel

not quite

Not exactly. A: "Are you promoting me?" B: "Not quite, but if you do well in this new position, I think you will get promoted in the future." I'm an A student, so of course I'm not quite pleased to get an A-!
See also: not, quite

*big as life (and twice as ugly)

 and *large as life (and twice as ugly); bigger than life (and twice as ugly)
Cliché a colorful way of saying that a person or a thing appeared, often surprisingly or dramatically, in a particular place. (*Also: as ~.) The little child just stood there as big as life and laughed very hard. I opened the door, and there was Tom as large as life. I came home and found this cat in my chair, as big as life and twice as ugly.
See also: big, life

feel for someone

to feel the emotional pain that someone else is feeling; to empathize or sympathize with someone. I really feel for you. I'm so sorry it turned out this way. Fred felt for Dave, but there was nothing he could do for him.
See also: feel

*feel for something

a natural or learned ability to do something. (*Typically: get ~; have ~.) I will do better with this work as soon as I get a feel for it. He doesn't have a feel for this kind of careful work.
See also: feel

I'm having quite a time.

 
1. Lit. I am having a very enjoyable time. John: Having fun? Jane: Oh, yes. I'm having quite a time. Bob: Do you like the seashore? Sally: Yes, I'm having quite a time.
2. Fig. I am having a very difficult time. Doctor: Well, what seems to be the problem? Mary: I'm having quite a time. It's my back. Doctor: Let's take a look at it. Father: How's school? Bill: Pretty tough. I'm having quite a time. Calculus is killing me.
See also: have, quite, time

quite a few

 and quite a lot; quite a bit; quite a number
much or many. Do you need one? I have quite a few. I have quite a bit—enough to spare some. How many? Oh, quite a number.
See also: few, quite

quite a something

definitely something; a good example of something. The captain of the swim team is quite a swimmer. That's quite a bruise you have there.
See also: quite

quite something

something very good or remarkable. You should see their new house. It's quite something. Meg's mother has bought a new hat for the wedding and it's quite something.

This doesn't quite suit me.

 and It doesn't quite suit me.
This is not quite what I want.; This does not please me. (Compare this with (It) suits me (fine).) Clerk: How do you like this one? Mary: It doesn't quite suit me. Bob: This doesn't quite suit me. Let me see something a little darker. Clerk: How's this? Bob: Better.
See also: quite, suit, this

quite a bit

a large number or amount She had quite a bit to say to him when he finally showed up.
See also: bit, quite

quite a change

something very different Claudia's new school is quite a change from her old one.
See also: change, quite

feel for somebody

to experience sympathy for someone I know she's unhappy, and I feel for her.
See also: feel

quite a few

a large number We watched quite a few of the World Cup matches on TV.
See also: few, quite

quite a lot

(spoken)
a large number or amount We've had quite a lot of rain this year.
See also: lot, quite

quite a ways

(spoken)
a long distance We're quite a ways from the Mexican border here.
See also: quite, way

quite a while

(spoken)
a long time I hadn't seen Rebecca in quite a while, but she hadn't changed much.
See also: quite

big as life

Also, large as life. In person, as in And there was Mary, big as life, standing right in front of me. This phrase transfers the same size as in real life (life-size) to an actual appearance. Sometimes this term is embellished with and quite as natural, presumably alluding to a likeness of a person or thing that closely resembles the real thing. A similar addition is and twice as natural, which doesn't make sense. [Late 1800s]
2. Also, larger than life; big as all outdoors. On a grand scale, as in The soap opera could well be called a larger-than-life drama, or That friend of his was as big as all outdoors. This phrase can be used either literally, for larger than life-size (second example) or figuratively. The phrase all outdoors has been used to compare something or someone to an immensity since the early 1800s.
See also: big, life

feel for

1. Grope, reach for with one's hands, as in It was pitch dark, and I felt for the doorknob. [Early 1700s]
2. feel for someone. Sympathize with or feel sorry for someone, as in Tom was so upset that I felt for him. This usage was put as feel with by Shakespeare: "It resounds as if it felt with Scotland" ( Macbeth, 4:3). Both senses of feel for are present in the somewhat sarcastic I feel for you but I can't quite reach you, meaning "Too bad, but I don't really feel sorry for you."
See also: feel

quite a bit

Also, quite a few; quite a lot. A considerable or moderate amount, as in There's still quite a bit of snow on the ground, or Quite a few parking spaces are open. [Second half of 1800s]
See also: bit, quite

feel for

v.
To sympathize or empathize with someone: I feel for the employees that were laid off.
See also: feel
References in periodicals archive ?
We have lost a couple of quite influential players in the lineout and we are not quite up to scratch there yet.
You've got to have quite a keen eye on the temperature, you've got to be quite on the ball, so it's quite a fine art," she said.
She likes the idea of going to the post room and getting my mail, and also that the canteens here are open quite long hours, and she can pick and choose what she eats.
This means it can be quite noisy, but it does deliver nearly 50mpg, while the CO2 emissions place it in the pounds 110 first year road tax band.
The kimberlite pipes showed up quite well with traditional geophysics and we were able to stake, drill and identify them quite early in the process.
Lucas is very specific, but he also gives dancers quite a bit of freedom, so I felt I could walk into the studio and not worry about any preconceived ideas," she says.
I didn't think they were quite that bad - San Esperito bounces with some color and life, with backgrounds ranging from shanty towns to small metro areas.
At all of the shows the staff of Recycling Today attends, there are quite a few significant "takeaways," whether they are developing great story ideas, increasing our industry knowledge, furthering our industry contacts or picking up hot news tips.
Achsa's character is also quite plausible as equal parts gifted writer and insecure adolescent who very willingly pours out her heart to the kind-hearted Presley and also gives him--at his request--short grammar lessons.
Precision sellers become quite good at coordinating many resources--more than just products for sale--to consistently deliver value and to make sure the customer sees that value.
Any student would benefit from having this on their shelf, and it would do quite good service as a bluffer's guide.
It was quite the experience to say the least; far different from the everyday life that I've grown accustomed to here in quiet Kandahar.
The apparent randomness of these drawings, with their scrawled, childish, slightly tortured quality, gradually resolves itself, if not quite into coherence, then at least into an unorthodox and often quite funny search for that coherence--conducted, perhaps, under a certain amount of duress.
To those accustomed to reading Clarence Major's wonderfully self-reflexive metafictions such as Reflex and Bone Structure and Emergency Exit, his new novel One Flesh will come as quite a surprise since it is, formally at least, a conventional "realistic" novel complete with linear plot, a fully reified setting, plausible characters, and a stable third person point of view.