put a premium on (something)

put a premium on (something)

1. To greatly increase the cost or scarcity of something. Because the city is so densely populated, landlords are able to put a premium on rented accommodation.
2. To place an especially high value on something; to consider something more important or valuable than is usual. We always put a premium on our customer service support, so never hesitate to contact us if you have a problem! With three young children, I put a premium on a shop where I can find everything I need in one stop.
See also: on, premium, put

put a premium on something

to make something harder or more expensive to obtain or do. The recent action of the bank directors put a premium on new home loans. The scarcity of steel put a premium on the cost of new cars.
See also: on, premium, put

put a premium on

Value more highly than usual, as in Her employer put a premium on honesty and hard work. First recorded in 1907, this term is almost always used figuratively.
See also: on, premium, put

put a premium on something

or

place a premium on something

If you put a premium on something or place a premium on it, you believe that it is very important or valuable. Companies like these put a premium on training. I place a high premium on what someone is like as a person.
See also: on, premium, put, something

put (or place) a premium on

regard as or make particularly valuable or important.
1998 New Scientist Enormous forces would have acted upon the skull and neck, putting a premium on size and strength.
See also: on, premium, put
References in classic literature ?
We have already hinted that it is not our purpose to trace down the history of the Pyncheon family, in its unbroken connection with the House of the Seven Gables; nor to show, as in a magic picture, how the rustiness and infirmity of age gathered over the venerable house itself.
And though now nailed amidst all the rustiness of iron bolts and the verdigris of copper spikes, yet, untouchable and immaculate to any foulness, it still preserved its Quito glow.
The audience took up the cry, the dogs barked more excitedly, and five minutes of hilarity delayed the turn which, when at last started, was marked by rustiness and erraticness on the part of the dogs and by great peevishness on the part of Wilton Davis.
There were red, coppery gleams on the roofs of houses, on the corners of walls, on the panels of carriages, on the very coats of the horses, and on the broad back of Mr Verloc's overcoat, where they produced a dull effect of rustiness.
A certain rustiness in Mr Venus, which never became so lubricated by the oil of Mr Wegg but that he turned under the screw in a creaking and stiff manner, was very noticeable at about this period.
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