pull

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pull

1. noun A drink or swig, especially alcohol from a bottle or flask. The old man took a long pull of whiskey, then flashed a toothless grin and began laughing again.
2. noun An inhalation or mouthful of smoke. I know I quit smoking, but let me just get a quick pull off your cigarette.
3. verb To take a drink or swig, especially alcohol from a bottle or flask. He pulled long and hard from the bottle of hooch.
4. verb To inhale or take in a mouthful of smoke. I know I quit smoking, but let me just get a quick pull off your cigarette.
5. verb To act as if one is punching someone, without making physical contact.(Short for "pull one's punches.") How dare you—have never pulled during a fight in my entire career!

pull (one's) punches

1. To act as if one is punching someone, without making any or much physical contact. (Short for "pull one's punches.") How dare you—have never pulled my punches during a fight in my entire career! I know you're trying to make the scene realistic, but please pull your punches next time!
2. By extension, to restrain one's commentary or criticism to avoid offending or upsetting someone. (Usually used in the negative.) I want your honest opinion of my story—don't pull your punches! Wow, your aunt really doesn't pull her punches. Is my sweatshirt really that ugly?
See also: pull, punch

pull

1. n. a drink; a swig; a drink from a flask. He took another pull and kept on talking.
2. tv. to take a drink or a mouthful of liquor from a bottle or other container. He pulled a slug from the bottle.
3. n. a mouthful of smoke from a cigarette; a drag on a cigarette. A couple of pulls and she crushed out the cigarette.
4. tv. to smoke a cigarette. He pulled a long filter job and then went back to work.
5. in. to pull one’s punches. (Martial arts.) If you pull during a fight, you’re through as a fighter.

pull

/yank (someone's) chain
To take unfair advantage of someone; deceive or manipulate someone.

pull

strings/wires Informal
To exert secret control or influence in order to gain an end.
See:
References in periodicals archive ?
Rail carts are pulled along a rail system and must be able to carry at least 6,000 pounds (the dogs' path is carpeted so they can achieve traction when pulling).
David Baird, of 15 Dike Drive, pulled papers to seek re-election to the Board of Assessors, where he currently serves as chairman.
Bowry pulled into the outside lane in front of the police car, but suddenly pulled across the motorway and stopped on the hard shoulder where he was arrested.
As the Rover pulled out, a blue Suzuki motorcycle, travelling in the same direction, pulled in front of her in the outside lane and stopped.
Somewhat dazed and realizing he was underwater, he immediately pulled the C[O.
The stacker was pulled alongside a header until it was full, and then pulled to the stack.
The technique, called off-the-bottom pulling, involved Per Aarsleff strategically fixing a combination of buoyancy tanks and stabilizing ballasting chains to the pipe to keep it just clear of the seabed contour and free from overstressing as it is incrementally launched and pulled by a winch from one shore to the other.
Elizabeth, an 8-year-veteran pediatric nurse is pulled to a busy adult medical-surgical unit.
Trevan did just that; he stepped back, pulled on the rod - and tripped over the tackle box.
This dangles down to the ringer below and must be pulled just hard enough for the bell to swing round on the wheel and come to a balance at the top before it swings back again the way it came.
The lumbar spine is lengthened downward, not pulled upward, as students are so often instructed.
In the middle of research by the American Small Business League for a CBS investigative report, the Small Business Administration abruptly pulled public information from the Central Contractor Registry that allows the determination of small-business status of federal contractors.
With HDD, a gentle arcing bore path is drilled horizontally beneath the surface, and then the pipe is joined section by section above ground, and then pulled through.
4 : to draw apart : tear, rend <I pulled a flower to pieces.
Five people have pulled papers for two, three-year terms on the Board of Selectmen.