pull oneself off

pull off

1. To forcibly remove something (from or off something else). In this usage, a noun or pronoun can be used between "pull" and "off." Don't pull off the bandage or the wound might get infected. Kids have been going around at night pulling numbers off the front of houses.
2. To suddenly or forcibly remove someone (from something). In this usage, a noun or pronoun can be used between "pull" and "off." The coach pulled me off when he saw that I was in pain. The host pulled off the guest panelist when he refused to answer the question. They're pulling her off the debate team because of what happened at the last competition.
3. To be able to perform or complete something, especially in the face of hardships, difficulties, or setbacks. In this usage, a noun or pronoun can be used between "pull" and "off." Congratulations on winning the case! I wasn't sure you'd pull it off. If they're able to pull off the merger, they would form the largest single corporation in the world.
4. To exit a road or highway, as by taking an exit or pulling onto the shoulder or another street or into a parking lot. If you pull off the highway at Exit 5, you'll be able to reach the town in less than an hour. We pulled off at a truck stop just outside the city. I think you've got a flat tire. You'd better pull off.
5. vulgar slang To masturbate a male until he ejaculates. Can be said of oneself or another male. In this usage, a noun or pronoun can be used between "pull" and "off."
See also: off, pull

pull oneself off

verb
See also: off, pull