pull alongside

pull (up) alongside (of someone or something)

to move to a point beside someone or something. (Of is usually retained before pronouns.) The car pulled up alongside the truck and honked and the people inside waved and waved. Please pull alongside the curb.
See also: alongside, pull
References in periodicals archive ?
Lt Chris L'Aime and his assistant Bill Hodgson pull alongside the trawler for boarding.
Enormous container ships are especially vulnerable at "choke points" such as the Malacca Straits, which connect the Pacific and Indian Ocean, where pirates in smaller, quicker boats can pull alongside and board.
I'd pull alongside them and they would say, "Do you want business?
For goodness sake let's get on with the business and pull alongside Britain's second city.
Port officials plan to dredge the harbor so big ships can pull alongside docks.
There were only a few of us to count six lighthouses flashing at various points to mark the perils off Prince Rupert, British Columbia; to see a boat pull alongside the stern, illuminate all of its deck lights and tie up briefly at this oceanbound beast in order to collect the Canadian pilot who had guided us from Vancouver; to gaze at the Milky Way's broad, brilliant canopy overhead; to marvel at the North Star, holding forth up ahead like a Chevy headlight on high beam.
The Kirkwall lifeboat was unable to pull alongside because of the severe weather conditions.
The second race was much better, even though I didn't get the best of starts to allow Edwards to pull alongside me.
The other rafts in our party were swept by, but the guide of the mayor's and my raft managed to pull alongside the troubled raft and, out of sight of the others, offload the unlucky rafters.
Reid, 38, shares the lead after the third round, finishing 10-under-par 206, after a 70 to pull alongside Sweden's Helen Alfredsson.