psyche


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psyched (out)

 
1. Inf. excited; overwhelmed; thrilled. She's really psyched out. That's great. I'm really psyched about my new job!
2. Inf. intoxicated. She's just lying there psyched out. Two beers and a shot of whiskey and he was psyched out.
See also: psyche

psyched (up)

Inf. completely mentally ready (for something). I'm really psyched for this test. The team isn't psyched up enough to do a good job.
See also: psyche

psyched up (for something)

Inf. excited and enthusiastic. I can play a great tennis game if I'm psyched up. She is really psyched up for the game.
See also: psyche, up

psyched (out)

1. mod. excited; overwhelmed; thrilled. She’s really psyched out.
2. mod. alcohol or drug intoxicated. (Drugs.) She’s just lying there, so psyched out.
See also: out, psyche

psyched

verb
See also: psyche

psyched (up)

mod. completely mentally ready (for something). I’m really psyched for this test.
See also: psyche, up

psyched

verb
See also: psyche
References in periodicals archive ?
Freud and Jung, pioneers in understanding the psyche, had not begun their work until after Hahnemann's death.
Wilson proposes a "theory of the psyche that is more extensive and less attached to the primacy of rationality, self-control, good judgment, and sound appraisal.
Pardoning her, the mighty Zeus rendered Psyche immortal so that she could now legitimately marry the divine Amor.
But since his days as a body-builder Arnold has shown a tendency to dominate and inflict humiliation that suggests a shadow region in his psyche that Reagan simply did not have.
Leigha, of Wyley Road, Radford, has always wanted a staffie and was delighted to get Psyche, whom she has had for a year.
Finally, we examine the myth of Psyche as one possibility of using story to enhance counselor growth in supervision.
It's altogether fitting that Keats should have chosen the goddess Psyche as the subject of the first of his great odes of 1819.
These symbolic associations of Psyche with spinning are supported by an art historian's assertion that the "musculature" of the armless statue of Aphrodite in the Louvre suggests that she was weaving.
The piece was initially welcomed by critics when first performed in 1888, and was subsequently admired by biographers and commentators, but Psyche has never found a secure place in the repertoire.
He envisages the human being in tripartite fashion as consisting in the distinct but not separate elements of spirit, psyche, and organism.
That a simple object like a pecan can bring back sensations from my past is not a feature unique to my psyche.
Unlike Mary Tighe's Psyche (1811), John Brown's Psyche: or, The Soul, A Poem.
But Nijinsky and Nureyev knew very well the dark side of the human psyche, and both lived with their own relentless demons.
According to Apuleius, the jealous Venus commanded her son Cupid (the god of love) to inspire Psyche with love for the most despicable of men.
Psyche was a beautiful maiden beloved by Cupid, who visited her every night but left her at sunrise.