pry out

pry out

1. Literally, to extract or remove something from something else with great force, especially with the use of a lever. A noun or pronoun can be used between "pry" and "out." I had to pry out all the rusty nails with the claw end of a hammer before we could begin repairing the damage to the fence. The sheriff pried the gun out of the suspect's hands.
2. To obtain or extract something, especially information, from someone with great effort, difficulty, or persistence. A noun or pronoun can be used between "pry" and "out." I had to pry the answer out of her when I asked where she had been. It was only after the judge threatened to charge him with contempt of court that his testimony was pried out of him.
See also: out, pry

pry something out

(of something) Go to pry something from something.
See also: out, pry

pry out

v.
1. To extract something with or as if with a lever: I pried out the staples from the thick report. They pried the microphone out of my hands to stop me from singing.
2. To obtain something from someone with effort or difficulty: The detectives finally pried a confession out of the suspect. They kept questioning me until they had pried out all the information.
See also: out, pry
References in periodicals archive ?
Carefully pry out the battery connector from its socket on the logic board using a plastic opening tool.
It allows the operator to easily rip rock, decomposed granite, limestone, sandstone, caliche, coral shale, asphalt or frozen ground with the maximum breakout force, It also can be used to pry out and carry stumps or boulders, rip a clean, narrow V trench for laying utilities and also scoop and load material.
Pry out the circular spring clip and pull the lift off the ball stud.
3 Pry out the circular spring clip on the new I ft and s de the socket onto the ball stud.
1 PRY out the stops with a thin pry bar or thin-blade putty knife.
You might have to smash the window and pry out the remaining glass one piece at a time.