provide for (someone or something)

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provide for (someone or something)

1. To supply or provide payment for the basic needs of someone or something. The hardest part of being unemployed was knowing that I couldn't provide for my family. The local council has promised to provide for low-income families in its upcoming budget.
2. To prepare for, deal with, or prevent something that will or may happen in the future. The more expensive insurance policy also provides for damage from natural disasters.
3. To supply as a stipulation (of a contract or agreement). You're lucky you're even given six weeks of maternity leave; most companies don't provide for any amount of time.
See also: provide

provide something for someone or something

to supply something for someone or something. I will provide salad for the guests. Ted provided food for his dog.
See also: provide

provide for someone or something

to supply the needs of someone or something. Don't worry, we will provide for you. We will provide for the committee in the budget.
See also: provide

provide for

v.
1. To supply someone or something with basic necessities, as food, shelter, and clothing: How long do you have to work every week to provide for such a large family?
2. To take measures in preparation for something: Our forecast provides for a 6 percent decrease in sales next year.
3. To set something down as a stipulation: Their employment contract provides for two weeks of vacation every year.
See also: provide
References in periodicals archive ?
Getting commercial insurance quotes on line might possibly simply take a minute or two in order to conduct, though the ready ended up necessary to be given ideal information to provide for someone to the insurance company normally takes much longer.
Defining what a service animal does can be quite complex given the range of functions it may provide for someone with a disability.
I love being able to provide for someone and care for someone and having my own baby.
More than half (53%) of health seekers report that their most recent health information session had some type of impact on their self-care habits or the care that they provide for someone else.
Not allowing someone to seek the highest and best use for his property is a subtle form of confiscation; depressing his property values, in essence, to provide for someone else's benefit.
You most definitely need a will to provide for someone you regard as the equivalent of a spouse.
Not allowing someone to seek the highest and best use for their property is a subtle form of confiscation - depressing their property values, in essence, to provide for someone else's benefit.