produce

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produce an attack

(of an illness) Go to an attack (of an illness).
See also: attack, produce

produce something for something

 
1. to make something for some purpose. This production line produces brackets for the installation of the circuit boards in the next production line. We produce the seats for the trucks that they assemble on the other side of town.
2. to bring something out for some purpose. Lee quickly produced a penknife for cutting the string on the package. Ruth can always produce the right tool for the job.
See also: produce

produce something from something

to create something from something; to make something out of something. We are able to produce a high-quality writing paper from the scraps we trim off the edges of the books as we bind them. Jane produces an excellent jelly from the grapes she grows in her backyard.
See also: produce

come up with/deliver/produce the ˈgoods

(informal) do what you are expected or have promised to do: You can depend on him to come up with the goods. If he says he’ll do something, he always does it.
See also: come, deliver, good, produce, up
References in classic literature ?
already I shudder for these comparatively degenerate days of my native village, when you cannot collect a load of bark of good thickness, and we no longer produce tar and turpentine.
The telephone men racked their brains to produce something cheaper to take its place, and they failed.
Only by renouncing our claim to discern a purpose immediately intelligible to us, and admitting the ultimate purpose to be beyond our ken, may we discern the sequence of experiences in the lives of historic characters and perceive the cause of the effect they produce (incommensurable with ordinary human capabilities), and then the words chance and genius become superfluous.
They have even calculated," continued the imperturbable Barbicane, "that the shock of each meteor on the sun ought to produce a heat equal to that of 4,000 masses of coal of an equal bulk.
It takes away the guard of reason, and consequently forces us to produce those symptoms, which many, when sober, have art enough to conceal.
Thus, while our own change of positions is known to embrace an orbit of about 200,000,000 of miles, it is nevertheless so trifling as to produce no apparent change of position in thousands of the fixed stars that are believed to be the suns of other systems.
The extent of their "scientific" knowledge, may be judged by the fact that they expected to produce (I give their own words)" a little blue sky" if "they went on long enough.
Bravery, therefore, and patience are necessary for labour, philosophy for rest, and temperance and justice in both; but these chiefly in time of peace and rest; for war obliges men to be just and temperate; but the enjoyment of pleasure, with the rest of peace, is more apt to produce insolence; those indeed who are easy in their circumstances, and enjoy everything that can make them happy, have great occasion for the virtues of temperance and justice.
Now in that night Boxtel would climb over the wall and, as he knew the position of the bulb which was to produce the grand black tulip, he would filch it; and instead of flowering for Cornelius, it would flower for him, Isaac; he also, instead of Van Baerle, would have the prize of a hundred thousand guilders, not to speak of the sublime honour of calling the new flower Tulipa nigra Boxtellensis, -- a result which would satisfy not only his vengeance, but also his cupidity and his ambition.
If you want to produce the right effect on her--" he looked hard at Alban and checked himself once more.
That most skilful breeder, Sir John Sebright, used to say, with respect to pigeons, that 'he would produce any given feather in three years, but it would take him six years to obtain head and beak.
Jonson's self-satisfaction and his critical sense of intellectual superiority to the generality of mankind produce also a marked and disagreeable lack of sympathy in his portrayal of both life and character.
The stubbed wastes yielded excellent harvests, and the superior quality of our agricultural produce was maintained through the increased supply of manure.
And therefore what they produce at home must be not only enough for themselves, but such both in quantity and quality as to accommodate those from whom their wants are supplied.
If you say the same thing to a child who does not yet know the word "motor," but does know the other words you are using, you produce a feeling of anxiety and doubt you will have to point and say, "There, that's a motor.