present

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all present and accounted for

All people or things being tallied are present, or their location or status is known or has been considered. While using "or" instead of "and" would make more sense logically, it is not used idiomatically in this way. "Have you finished checking the inventory?" "Yes sir, all present and accounted for."
See also: account, all, and, present

at present

Currently. I'm sorry, we are not accepting applications at present. Mr. Green is not in the office at present. Can I take a message?
See also: present

at the present time

Right now. I'm sorry, but we're not accepting applications at the present time. She's busy at the present time—can she call you back later?
See also: present, time

present company excepted

Without regards to the person or people in one's immediate vicinity. Everyone in this school is a self-centred, spoiled little brat. Present company excepted, of course. Present company excepted, there isn't a single person in this building who has the skills it takes to run the business.
See also: company, except, present

present company excluded

Without regards to the person or people in one's immediate vicinity. Everyone in this school is a self-centered, spoiled little brat. Present company excluded, of course. Present company excluded, there isn't a single person in this building who has the skills it takes to run the business.
See also: company, exclude, present

for the present

At the present moment; for now. For the present, our plans remain unchanged until something convinces us otherwise. Let's just stay focused on this for the present. We can address other issues later in the meeting.
See also: present

on a silver platter

Without having put forth much effort. Of course the CEO's daughter got the job without having to interviewing—she gets everything on a silver platter.
See also: on, platter, silver

there's no time like the present

If something is a good idea, is worth doing, or needs to be done, it should be done now or as soon as possible. A: "When do you want me to start cleaning the house?" B: "Well, there's no time like the present." There's no time like the present, so let's go ahead and get the application started.
See also: like, present, time

for the moment

Just for right now. Please sit here for the moment while I prepare your table.
See also: moment

at present

now; at this point in time. We are not able to do any more at present. We may be able to lend you money next week, but not at present.
See also: present

at the present time

 and at this point (in time)
Cliché now; at present. (Used often as a wordy replacement for now.) We don't know the location of the stolen car at the present time. The patient is doing nicely at the present time.
See also: present, time

for the moment

 and for the time being
for the present; for now; temporarily. This quick fix will have to do for the moment. This is all right for the time being. It'll have to be improved next week, however. This good feeling will last only for the time being.
See also: moment

live in the present

Fig. to deal with contemporary events and not be dominated by events of the past or planning for the future. Forget the past; live in the present. It was no longer possible to get Uncle Herman to live in the present.
See also: live, present

*on a silver platter

Fig. using a presentation [of something] that is appropriate for a very formal setting. (*Typically: give something to someone ~; present something ~; serve something ~; want something ~.) Aren't paper plates good enough for you? You want dinner maybe on a silver platter?
See also: on, platter, silver

present someone (to someone) (at something)

to introduce someone to someone at some event. They presented him to the queen at her birthday party. I will present you to the rest of the committee.

present something to someone

 and present someone with something
to give something to someone, especially if done ceremoniously. They presented a watch to me when I retired. They presented me with a watch when I retired.
See also: present

(There's) no time like the present.

Prov. Cliché Do what you are supposed to do now. (You can use this to suggest that something be done right away.) Jill: When should we start cleaning up the house? Jane: No time like the present. Start studying for the big exam now, instead of waiting till the night before. There's no time like the present.
See also: like, present, time

all present and accounted for

All members or items of a group are here or their whereabouts are known, as in Is everyone ready to board the bus?-All present and accounted for. This expression almost certainly originated in the armed forces as a response to roll call. By proper logic, the and should be or. Nevertheless, the expression is used colloquially to offer assurance that no person or thing is missing.
See also: account, all, and, present

at present

Also, at the present time. Now, as in I've not enough cash at present to lend you any, or At present the house is still occupied. This slightly longer way of saying "at this time" formerly was even longer- at this present or at that present -denoting a more specific time. [Mid-1600s] Also see at this point.
See also: present

for the moment

Also, for the present; for the time being. Temporarily, during the period under consideration, for now. For example, For the moment I am tied up, but I'll get to it next week, or This room arrangement will do for the present, or Jim will act as secretary for the time being. The first term dates from the late 1800s, the first variant from the mid-1500s, and the second variant from the late 1400s.
See also: moment

no time like the present, there's

Do or say it now, as in Go ahead and call him-there's no time like the present. This adage was first recorded in 1562. One compiler of proverbs, John Trusler, amplified it: "No time like the present, a thousand unforeseen circumstances may interrupt you at a future time" ( Proverbs Exemplified, 1790).
See also: like, time

present company excepted

People say present company excepted when they say something about other people, to show that they are not referring to the people or person they are with. Men are hopeless at expressing their feelings, present company excepted, of course. Note: This expression is usually used when people are saying something critical or unpleasant about other people.
See also: company, except, present

on a silver platter

or

on a platter

If you are given something on a silver platter or on a platter, you are given it without having to work or make an effort to get it. You expect me to hand you everything on a silver platter, and when you don't get it, you stamp your little foot and cry. The Opposition has been handed this issue on a platter. Note: A platter is a large plate or shallow dish used for serving food.
See also: on, platter, silver

all present and correct

used to indicate that not a single thing or person is missing.
1982 Bernard MacLaverty A Time to Dance She began to check it, scraping the coins towards her quickly and building them into piles. ‘All present and correct,’ she said.
See also: all, and, correct, present

(there is) no time like the present

used to suggest that something should be done now rather than later.
See also: like, present, time

present company excepted

excluding those who are here now.
See also: company, except, present

on a silver platter (or salver)

without having been asked or sought for; without requiring any effort or return from the recipient.
The image here is of a butler or waiter presenting something on a silver tray.
See also: on, platter, silver

all ˌpresent and corˈrect

(British English) (American English all ˌpresent and acˈcounted for) (spoken) used to say that all the things or people who should be there are now there: ‘Now, is everybody here?’ ‘All present and correct, Sir!’
This is used in the army to inform an officer that none of the soldiers in his or her unit are missing, injured, etc.
See also: all, and, correct, present

at ˈpresent

now; at the moment: How many people are living in this house at present?
See also: present

make a ˈpresent of something (to somebody)

make it easy for somebody to take or steal something from you, or to gain an advantage over you, because you have been careless: Before you go out, lock all the doors and windows. Don’t make a present of your property (to thieves).
See also: make, of, present, something

on ˈpresent form

judging by somebody/something’s present performance or behaviour; as things are at the moment: On present form I’d say he should win easily.A painting by Durant could sell for over a million on present form.
See also: form, on, present

present company exˈcepted

(also excepting present ˈcompany) used as a polite remark to show that the criticisms you are making are not directed at the people you are talking to: My feeling is that the people around here, present company excepted of course, are rather unfriendly.
See also: company, except, present

the ˌpresent ˈday

modern times; now: These customs have continued right up to the present day.Present-day attitudes to women are very different.
See also: present

(hand something to somebody) on a silver ˈplatter

give something to somebody without expecting them to do or give anything in return: I don’t like her at all — she expects to be handed everything on a silver platter as if she’s better than other people.
A platter is a large plate that is used for serving food.
See also: on, platter, silver

(there’s) no time like the ˈpresent

(saying) the best time to do something is now: ‘When do you want me to start the decorating?’ ‘Well, no time like the present, is there?’
See also: like, present, time

at present

At the present time; right now.
See also: present

for the present

For the time being; temporarily.
See also: present
References in periodicals archive ?
For this very reason, he argues, the fruition of sporting events rapidly drains them of their ability to provide readers with the qualities of drama and suspense endemic to written narratives; sporting events thus remain unavoidably contingent upon their presentness.
It was so obviously and totally the present, so unabashed and even garish with its presentness, beamingly right there right now like Rita Hayworth, all Sixth Avenue was in fact at two o'clock a thumping bright Rita Hayworth and the young man strode south irresistibly.
In Romantic scholarship contemporary with Jameson's work, and in an explicit challenge to materialist ideology critique, Paul Fry has for years attended to the shining-forth of presentness in Keats (and more recently in Wordsworth).
The presentness of this moment is haunted already by imminent change.
Artists either have the talent to communicate the presentness of old
One is presentness, making everything very immediate, emphasizing the here and now.
This is borne out by our very experience of tense as properly and irreducibly basic (chapter 5); while this idea of properly basic belief (ably exposited by Alvin Plantinga) is prima facie rather than ultima facie, it stands up to Mellorian counterexamples or potential defeaters (for example, witnessing the alleged presentness of a supernova through a telescope), which Craig deftly rebuts.
This, for Weber, is the first manifestation of a preoccupation in Balthus's work with the elusiveness of that which is desired--be it youth, rapture, inspiration, contentment, sexual or spiritual realization, or the exulted presentness to a full experience of the world.
For him, brief texts are oriented toward the present and presentness.
A nearby cell-phone-signal jammer offers the ever-connected viewer a reprieve from text and e-mail interruptions, enforcing a literal presentness.
Though the poem calls into play a prodigious nostalgia for the poetic world of the scholar-gipsy, a world uninfected by "this strange disease of modern life," it also summons, in a muted but persistent counterpoint, the presentness of the poetic past.
As Bryan Wolf points out, conventional associations of the visual with nonverbal immediacy consign the visual arts to the "myth of presentness," Lessing's spatiality, wherea s the modern world associates rhetoric, which implies a manipulation of "facts" or words in order to influence, exclusively with language (1990, 185).
Grunbaum misconstrues presentness and offers what turn out to be linguistic confusions to support a B-theory.
Cain's interest might lie in the transcendence of materiality, but she nevertheless redoubles her claims for the presentness of things and our relationship to them in the here and now.
Students, by reading texts that explore identities (often in pairs: Jamaica Kincaid's "On Seeing England for the First Time" and, say, Joseph Conrad's "Heart of Darkness") and by writing and talking about their own identities, and the difficulties they encounter in doing so, will have the opportunity to note the disconnection between their selves (the presentness of their existence, their "I") and the written first-person pronoun.