prejudice

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terminate (someone) with extreme prejudice

To kill someone without hesitation, mercy, or discernment. The general warned the rebels that they must either surrender or be terminated with extreme prejudice. We must terminate these terrorists with extreme prejudice to ensure the safety of our country.

kill (someone) with extreme prejudice

To kill someone without hesitation, mercy, or discernment. The general warned the rebels that they must either surrender or be killed with extreme prejudice. We must kill these terrorists with extreme prejudice to ensure the safety of our country.
See also: extreme, kill, prejudice

without prejudice

1. Without any detriment to or waiver of an existing or inherent legal right or claim. A: "But didn't the judge already decided the case in our favor?" B: "No, he dismissed it, but without prejudice, so the other party has the right to open another lawsuit against us."
2. Of an offer, not to be admissible in a court of law, especially as an admission or liability or guilt. The company offered to settle out of court for $250,000 without prejudice for the accident.
See also: prejudice, without

prejudice someone or something against someone or something

to turn someone or a group against someone or something. I believe that the lawyer was trying to prejudice the jury against the defendant. The discussion about how calves are raised prejudiced me against eating veal.
See also: prejudice

terminate someone with extreme prejudice

murder or assassinate someone. euphemistic, chiefly US
The expression originated in the terminology of the Central Intelligence Agency in the 1970s.

without ˈprejudice (to something)

(law) without affecting any other legal matter: They agreed to pay compensation without prejudice (= without admitting guilt).
See also: prejudice, without
References in periodicals archive ?
Prejudice and partisanship are the worst enemies of the solidarity of communities.
This enabled the guest to converse without being able to form any prejudice about their fellow diners based on physical appearance.
Can loving-kindness reduce prejudice toward two stigmatized groups, the homeless and African Americans?
better grip and possible revision of standard 1 (SQSS) criterion 1d: " Provider creates and applies internal rules to protect people from prejudice and negative opinions that might occur as a result of the provision of social services.
Colleges and universities are microcosms of society and are therefore a logical place to address racial prejudice and prepare students to function in todays' racially diverse society.
Prejudices support numerous other psychological functions that need not concern us here.
Throughout decades, researchers have paid attention to the meaning, measurement, etiology and consequences of prejudice and, also, to the potential reduction of prejudice by different means (see Paluck & Green, 2009, for a review of theories and methods).
People who are obese, or short, but capable, often do not get jobs for which they are qualified; ethnicity is often a target of prejudice; prejudice still exists from the Civil War; and "plain" women often can't get TV positions as commentators or weather people.
Results from a second study suggest that observers actually perceive and use fWHR when evaluating another person's degree of prejudice.
Racist behavior appears when social norms are weak or ambiguous, so that prejudice is attributed to factors other than the ethnic group.
For ease of interpretation, we shall use the term congruent prejudice to indicate when out-groups are viewed equally positive or negative, and the term discordant prejudice to indicate when different out-groups are not viewed equally positive and negative.
Around one in four showed some prejudice towards ethnic minority groups such as Asians.
Ultimately, my goal for the exploration of the novel is to understand why the prejudices in the novel are controversial and what Twain's purpose was in using these prejudices.
Sometimes, certainly, a decent person has to admit to overwhelming feelings, values or prejudices, but the test is the word ``overwhelming.
Cardinal Walter Kasper, president of the Pontifical Council for Promoting Christian Unity: "There are a lot of prejudices about him, and most of these prejudices are unfair.