prairie dog

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prairie dog

in. [for people in office cubicles] to pop up to see what’s going on in the rest of the office. Everybody was prairie dogging to see what was going on.
See also: dog
References in periodicals archive ?
Rosemary Vodka Lemonade 1 1/2 oz rosemary-infused Prairie Organic Vodka 2 1/2 oz freshly squeezed lemonade
Slobodchikoff tested the theory by having one person walk out onto a prairie dog colony wearing different colored t-shirts at different times.
BIG NUMBERS I have had the good fortune of hunting at Prairie Grouse Haven with good friend Chance Colombe, a licensed Native American guide from Mission, S.
This bird relies on prairie dogs to nibble grass, creating clearings so plovers can build their nests on the ground.
Many view prairie plants as weeds, or fear the tall grasses could hide snakes.
In his research, Slobodchikoff records the alarm calls and subsequent escape behaviours of prairie dogs in response to approaching predators.
8220;We are honored to receive this prestigious award and look forward to a continued strong relationship with the people and businesses of Grand Prairie, especially as we open our third branch here.
The last chapter (10) aims at promoting prairie restoration and reconstruction as a form of sustainable landscape.
In 1993, while conducting surveillance of natural areas, Illinois Nature Preserves Commission (INPC) and the Illinois Department of Natural Resources (IDNR) personnel described Hulsebus Hill prairie as "barely hanging on" due to woody plant invasion.
Other La Prairie treatments include a 90-minute 'La Prairie Radiance Gold Facial' (pounds 135).
The editors began the project with expectations about the nature of prairie writing.
376) talks of restoring prairies to an earlier state, but if the concepts summarized in Charles C.
Native prairie plants are plants that originated naturally on the prairies of Canada and the United States.
In and through their readings of prairie writing, literary scholars (most notably Henry Kreisel, Laurie Ricou, and Dick Harrison) have constructed a "generalized prairie reality" (6) in which "landscape dominates culture and geography effaces history" (8).
In 1840, a young traveler named Eliza Steele ventured into Illinois and was dazzled by the tallgrass prairie near the city of Joliet.