practice

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Related to practiced: practised

sharp practice

Underhanded, deceitful, cunning, or particularly sneaky practice, especially in business, that is technically within the scope of the law but which may be considered immoral or unethical. The investment banking sector has been tightly reined in by the government after the sharp practice that went unchecked for so many years and cost so many people their life savings.
See also: practice, sharp

in practice

 
1. in the actual doing of something; in reality. Our policy is to be very particular, but in practice we don't care that much. The instructions say not to set it too high. In practice I always set it as high as possible.
2. well-rehearsed; well-practiced; well-exercised. The swimmer was not in practice and almost drowned. I play the piano for a living, and I have to keep in practice.
See also: practice

make a practice of something

 and make something a practice
to turn something into a habitual activity. Jane makes a practice of planting daisies every summer. Her mother also made it a practice.
See also: make, of, practice

*out of practice

performing poorly due to a lack of practice. (*Typically: be ~; get ~; go ~.) I used to be able to play the piano extremely well, but now I'm out of practice. The baseball players lost the game because they were out of practice.
See also: of, out, practice

Practice makes perfect.

Prov. Cliché Doing something over and over again is the only way to learn to do it well. Jill: I'm not going to try to play the piano anymore. I always make so many mistakes. Jane: Don't give up. Practice makes perfect. Child: How come you're so good at peeling potatoes? Father: I did it a lot in the army, and practice makes perfect.
See also: make, perfect, practice

practice (up)on someone or something

to train or drill on someone or something. (In preparation for the real thing. Upon is formal and less commonly used than on.) I do not want a dental student practicing upon me. I want to learn how to braid hair. Can I practice on you?
See also: on, practice

Practice what you preach.

Prov. Cliché You yourself should do the things you advise other people to do. Dad always told us we should only watch an hour of television every day, but we all knew he didn't practice what he preached.
See also: practice, preach

put something into practice

to make a suggested procedure the actual procedure. That is a good policy. I suggest you put it into practice immediately. I plan to put the new technique into practice as soon as I can.
See also: practice, put

in practice

1. actually In theory, the license fee is only $5 but, because other costs get added on, in practice it is more like $20. Opposite of: in theory
2. prepared It must have been six years since I took a girl out, and I wasn't in practice for the dating game.
Opposite of: out of practice
See also: practice

make a practice of doing something

to do something regularly or as a habit I don't make a practice of recommending restaurants, but this one is really special.
See also: make, of, practice

out of practice

not prepared When I take time off from work, I get out of practice and have trouble getting up in the morning.
Opposite of: in practice
See also: of, out, practice

practice what you preach

to behave the way you tell other people to behave Other countries need to see that we practice what we preach when it comes to human rights. I practice what I preach in that I exercise almost every day.
See also: practice, preach

Practice makes perfect.

something that you say which means if you do something many times you will learn to do it very well You can't expect to become a brilliant dancer overnight, but practice makes perfect.
See also: make, perfect, practice

practise what you preach

  (British & Australian) also practice what you preach (American)
to do what you advise other people to do I would have more respect for him if he practised what he preaches.
See also: preach

in practice

1. Actually, in fact, especially as opposed to theoretically or in principle. For example, In practice this contraption seems to work, although no one knows how or why. [Second half of 1500s] Also see put into practice.
2. In the exercise of a particular profession, as in She's an obstetrician and has been in practice for at least ten years. [c. 1700]
3. In a state of being exercised so as to maintain one's skill, as in This trumpeter is always in practice. [Early 1600s] For an antonym, see out of practice.
See also: practice

make a practice of

Habitually do something, as in Bill makes a practice of checking the oil and gas before every long trip. [c. 1900]
See also: make, of, practice

out of practice

No longer used to doing something, no longer adept for lack of doing something, as in Mom hadn't baked a cake in years-she said she was out of practice. [Late 1800s] Also see in practice.
See also: of, out, practice

practice makes perfect

Frequently doing something makes one better at doing it, as in I've knit at least a hundred sweaters, but in my case practice hasn't made perfect. This proverbial expression was once put as Use makes mastery, but by 1560 the present form had become established.
See also: make, perfect, practice

practice what you preach

Behave as you would have others behave, as in You keep telling us to clean up, but I wish you'd practice what you preach. This idiom expresses an ancient idea but appeared in this precise form only in 1678. Also see do as I say.
See also: practice, preach

put into practice

Also, put in practice. Carry out in action, as in It's time we put these new ideas into practice. Shakespeare used this idiom in Two Gentlemen of Verona (3:2): "Thy advice, this night, I'll put in practice." [Mid-1500s]
See also: practice, put

sharp practice

Crafty or deceitful dealings, especially in business. For example, That firm's known for its sharp practice, so I'd rather not deal with them. This expression, first recorded in 1836, uses sharp in the combined sense of "mentally acute" and "cutting."
See also: practice, sharp
References in classic literature ?
Monsieur, I know it and have practiced it; I would have continued to do so still, but - "
1) In other words, a skill or piece may be practiced as a whole or it may be practiced in pieces.
The philosophy is that as the music progresses, the student becomes stronger and stronger in the performance since the later sections of the piece have been practiced much more than the beginning sections.
Quality and utilization problems of physicians who practiced within large groups throughout the study were expected to be fewer than those of physicians in small or independent practices and to remain constant over the study period.
This amount was nearly the same (within 2 percent) of the average hospital charge of physicians who practiced exclusively in large group practices throughout the study period.
For single specialty groups, limiting the departing physician's practice to the specialty being practiced is strongly recommended.