practice


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Related to practice: practise

sharp practice

Underhanded, deceitful, cunning, or particularly sneaky practice, especially in business, that is technically within the scope of the law but which may be considered immoral or unethical. The investment banking sector has been tightly reined in by the government after the sharp practice that went unchecked for so many years and cost so many people their life savings.
See also: practice, sharp

in practice

1. As something actually is or is done in reality, as opposed to in theory. Yes, that was the hypothesis, but these things often turn out quite different in practice. In practice, that rule is not strictly enforced, so a lot of players get away with it.
2. In the state of being prepared due to having practiced something regularly, recently, and/or to a sufficient degree. I used to be able to do this with my eyes closed, but I'm really not in practice.
3. Serving in a professional field, often as a doctor, attorney, etc. Dr. Johnson is retiring after having been in practice for more than 30 years.
See also: practice

out of practice

Not having done something in a long time, and no longer skillful as a result. Wow, I haven't swung a bat in 10 years—I'm out of practice! I wanted to play songs on the guitar for my brother's wedding, but I was too out of practice.
See also: of, out, practice

practice makes perfect

Practicing or repeatedly doing something will make one become proficient or skillful at it. A: "I just can't seem to get the rhythm of this song quire right." B: "Keep at it—practice makes perfect!" You can't expect to start a new sport and be amazing at it right away. As is always the case, practice makes perfect.
See also: make, perfect, practice

practice what (one) preaches

To do the things or behave the way that one advises, dictates, or espouses. My parents always told us to respect each other and not to bicker, and they really did practice what they preached. If you're going to tell your employees not to incur excessive, unnecessary costs, then you had better practice what you preach.
See also: practice, preach, what

make a practice of (doing something)

To do something habitually. I've made a practice of doing 50 pushups every morning when I get out of bed. If you make a practice of investing some of your spare income, you'll be pleasantly surprised how much can build up.
See also: make, of, practice

make a habit of (doing something)

To do something habitually. I've made a habit of doing 50 pushups every morning when I get out of bed. If you make a habit of investing some of your spare income, you'll be pleasantly surprised how much can build up.
See also: habit, make, of

put (something) into practice

To carry out or commence doing something that had heretofore only been discussed, suggested, or planned. We've decided to put your ideas into practice for the next meeting. I've been putting that technique you showed me into practice during my training sessions.
See also: practice, put

in practice

 
1. in the actual doing of something; in reality. Our policy is to be very particular, but in practice we don't care that much. The instructions say not to set it too high. In practice I always set it as high as possible.
2. well-rehearsed; well-practiced; well-exercised. The swimmer was not in practice and almost drowned. I play the piano for a living, and I have to keep in practice.
See also: practice

make a practice of something

 and make something a practice
to turn something into a habitual activity. Jane makes a practice of planting daisies every summer. Her mother also made it a practice.
See also: make, of, practice

*out of practice

performing poorly due to a lack of practice. (*Typically: be ~; get ~; go ~.) I used to be able to play the piano extremely well, but now I'm out of practice. The baseball players lost the game because they were out of practice.
See also: of, out, practice

Practice makes perfect.

Prov. Cliché Doing something over and over again is the only way to learn to do it well. Jill: I'm not going to try to play the piano anymore. I always make so many mistakes. Jane: Don't give up. Practice makes perfect. Child: How come you're so good at peeling potatoes? Father: I did it a lot in the army, and practice makes perfect.
See also: make, perfect, practice

practice (up)on someone or something

to train or drill on someone or something. (In preparation for the real thing. Upon is formal and less commonly used than on.) I do not want a dental student practicing upon me. I want to learn how to braid hair. Can I practice on you?
See also: on, practice

Practice what you preach.

Prov. Cliché You yourself should do the things you advise other people to do. Dad always told us we should only watch an hour of television every day, but we all knew he didn't practice what he preached.
See also: practice, preach, what

put something into practice

to make a suggested procedure the actual procedure. That is a good policy. I suggest you put it into practice immediately. I plan to put the new technique into practice as soon as I can.
See also: practice, put

in practice

1. Actually, in fact, especially as opposed to theoretically or in principle. For example, In practice this contraption seems to work, although no one knows how or why. [Second half of 1500s] Also see put into practice.
2. In the exercise of a particular profession, as in She's an obstetrician and has been in practice for at least ten years. [c. 1700]
3. In a state of being exercised so as to maintain one's skill, as in This trumpeter is always in practice. [Early 1600s] For an antonym, see out of practice.
See also: practice

make a practice of

Habitually do something, as in Bill makes a practice of checking the oil and gas before every long trip. [c. 1900]
See also: make, of, practice

out of practice

No longer used to doing something, no longer adept for lack of doing something, as in Mom hadn't baked a cake in years-she said she was out of practice. [Late 1800s] Also see in practice.
See also: of, out, practice

practice makes perfect

Frequently doing something makes one better at doing it, as in I've knit at least a hundred sweaters, but in my case practice hasn't made perfect. This proverbial expression was once put as Use makes mastery, but by 1560 the present form had become established.
See also: make, perfect, practice

practice what you preach

Behave as you would have others behave, as in You keep telling us to clean up, but I wish you'd practice what you preach. This idiom expresses an ancient idea but appeared in this precise form only in 1678. Also see do as I say.
See also: practice, preach, what

put into practice

Also, put in practice. Carry out in action, as in It's time we put these new ideas into practice. Shakespeare used this idiom in Two Gentlemen of Verona (3:2): "Thy advice, this night, I'll put in practice." [Mid-1500s]
See also: practice, put

sharp practice

Crafty or deceitful dealings, especially in business. For example, That firm's known for its sharp practice, so I'd rather not deal with them. This expression, first recorded in 1836, uses sharp in the combined sense of "mentally acute" and "cutting."
See also: practice, sharp

practice makes perfect

COMMON People say practice makes perfect to mean that if you practise something enough, you will eventually be able to do it perfectly. It is like learning to ride a bike. You may fall off a few times but practice makes perfect.
See also: make, perfect, practice

practice makes perfect

regular exercise of an activity or skill is the way to become proficient in it.
See also: make, perfect, practice

make a ˈhabit/ˈpractice of something

do something regularly: I don’t usually make a practice of staying up so late, but there was a programme on TV I wanted to watch.

in ˈpractice

in reality; in fact; in a real or normal situation: The pilot is there to fly the plane, but in practice it flies itself most of the time.In theory it should work very well, but in practice it doesn’t.
See also: practice

ˌin/ˌout of ˈpractice

having practised/having not practised a skill regularly for a period of time: I’ve got to keep in practice if I’m going to win this race.I haven’t played the piano for a while so I’m a bit out of practice.
See also: of, out, practice

ˌpractice makes ˈperfect

(saying) a way of encouraging people by telling them that if you do an activity regularly you will become very good at it: If you want to learn a language, speak it as much as you can. Practice makes perfect!
See also: make, perfect, practice

put something into ˈpractice

actually do or carry out something which was only planned or talked about before: It’s not always easy to put your ideas into practice.
See also: practice, put, something

sharp ˈpractice

clever but dishonest methods of business, etc: There’s a lot of sharp practice in the second-hand car business.
See also: practice, sharp
References in periodicals archive ?
How best to streamline the regulatory process and its costs to ensure that all CPAs are licensed and regulated equally regardless of where they practice or who employs them has been a work in progress for more than a decade.
Johnston's goal is to teach teachers how to become practice experts so they, in turn, can teach their students how to become practice experts.
Many sellers will conduct due diligence on their own practices in advance of a sale, including reviewing contracts to determine if they are assignable, financial records to ensure there are no conditions that a buyer will find undesirable, the malpractice or employee claims history, and that all policies and procedures are in accordance with laws and standards of practice.
Rather than losing these valuable resources, medical practices must find ways to keep this group active by adjusting the traditional practice model.
One thought-provoking example is Thyer's call for an interdisciplinary rather than social work specific approach to practice guidelines.
Marketing for any type of practice should be one-third external and two-thirds internal.
The Code of Practice provides a high-level statement of the key elements of a records management program recommended for public bodies subject to the FOI Act.
Adolescent sexual and reproductive health services--especially confidential services--are not universally available from primary care practices in the Washington, DC, area, according to a 1998-1999 survey of physicians and office staff.
Practicing Theology invites the reader to recognize the theological quality of everyday practices as well as the practical importance of theology and belief for Christian living.
When configured to your specific environment, Active Practices enable Practice Manager to execute processes in a consistent, repeatable fashion -- leveraging your unique infrastructure and conforming to your specific management policies.
1 Do your talking in meetings, not on the practice field.
Against this context it is useful to consider the antecedent events that have led to the focus of this special issue: the practice of career development.
The adoption of the initial eight enforceable Statements on Standards for Tax Services (SSTSs) (see the October 2000 issue of Journal of Accountancy) makes it important for CPAs to examine their tax practices' quality control procedures and tax practice review (TPR) process.
El Camino Real principal Ron Bauer said the mother of one player called him to complain about the practice time, but that she did not reveal her name.