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assume the position

1. To take over the role and responsibilities of a particular job. My boss wants me to assume the position of treasurer this year, but I don't know if I want the extra workload.
2. A command issued by US law enforcement officers, meaning to stand with one's back to the officer and hold one's arms in a position to be either handcuffed or frisked. Primarily heard in US, South Africa. I knew I was in trouble when they asked me out of the car, but I knew I was going to jail when they told me to assume the position.
See also: assume, position

cowgirl position

A sex poisition in which the woman is on top of the man, with both partners facing each other. The Kama Sutra is totally blowing my mind! All I knew before was the cowgirl position!
See also: position

come in a certain position

to finish in a certain position or rank. Fred came in fourth in the race. He was afraid he would come in last.
See also: certain, come, position

come to the job with something

 and come to the position with something; come to the task with something
to bring a particular quality to a task or job. She comes to the job with great enthusiasm. Ann comes to this position with a lot of experience.
See also: come, job

jockey for position

1. Lit. to work one's horse into a desired position in a horse race. Three riders were jockeying for position in the race. Ken was behind, but jockeying for position.
2. . Fig. to work oneself into a desired position. The candidates were jockeying for position, trying to get the best television exposure. I was jockeying for position but running out of campaign money.
See also: jockey, position

jockey someone or something into position

to manage to get someone or something into a desirable position. (See also jockey for position.) The rider jockeyed his horse into position. Try to jockey your bicycle into position so you can pass the others.
See also: jockey, position

make someone's position clear

to clarify where someone stands on an issue. I don't think you understand what I said. Let me make my position dear. I can't tell whether you are in favor of or against the proposal. Please make your position clear.
See also: clear, make, position

place someone in an awkward position

Fig. to put someone in an embarrassing or delicate situation. Your decision places me in an awkward position. I'm afraid I have put myself in sort of an awkward position.
See also: awkward, place, position

put someone in an awkward position

to make a situation difficult for someone; to make it difficult for someone to evade or avoid acting. Your demands have put me in an awkward position. I don't know what to do. I'm afraid I've put myself in sort of an awkward position.
See also: awkward, position, put

the missionary position

a sexual position in which the woman lies on her back with the man on top and facing her And for the less adventurous, there's always the good old missionary position.
See also: position

be in pole position

  (British & Australian)
to be in the best position to win a competition
Usage notes: In motor racing, pole position is the best place a car can start from.
(often + to do sth) United are in pole position to win the championship this year.
See also: pole, position

jockey for position

Maneuver or manipulate for one's own benefit, as in The singers are always jockeying for position on stage. This expression, dating from about 1900, originally meant maneuvering a race horse into a better position for winning. It was transferred to other kinds of manipulation in the mid-1900s.
See also: jockey, position

scoring position, in

About to succeed, as in The publisher is in scoring position with that instant book about the trial. This term comes from sports, where it signifies being in a spot where scoring is likely. In baseball it refers to a situation in which a runner is on second or third base. The figurative use of the term dates from the second half of the 1900s.
See also: score
References in classic literature ?
He explained his position in the matter by saying that he was prepared to teach that the earth was either flat or round, according to the preference of a majority of his patrons.
My curiosity was aroused to such an extent that I made inquiry as to who the "Governor" was, and soon found that he was a coloured man who at one time had held the position of Lieutenant-Governor of his state.
Standing alone in the world -- alone, as to any dependence on society, and with little Pearl to be guided and protected -- alone, and hopeless of retrieving her position, even had she not scorned to consider it desirable -- she cast away the fragment a broken chain.
Then the very nature of the opposite sex, or its long hereditary habit, which has become like nature, is to be essentially modified before woman can be allowed to assume what seems a fair and suitable position.
To be able to crush it absolutely he awaited the arrival of the rest of the troops who were on their way from Vienna, and with this object offered a three days' truce on condition that both armies should remain in position without moving.
You are in a position to seize its baggage and artillery.
Coulson, but if I were in your position, and knew that a friendly country was feeling a little bit sore at having two of her citizens disposed of so unceremoniously, I'd do my best to prove, by the only possible means, that I was taking the matter seriously.
Coulson admitted, "has been remarkably clear, but the question I asked you was this,--what is to be the position of your country in the event of war between Japan and America?
Mystery in the position of a lodger carries with it--what shall I say?
I am in a position to tell you, madam, what your mother-in-law's name really is.
And again every detail of his quarrel with his wife was present to his imagination, all the hopelessness of his position, and worst of all, his own fault.
He did not succeed in adapting his face to the position in which he was placed towards his wife by the discovery of his fault.
And there you have the statement of my claims to fill the position which I occupy in these pages.
I had accepted the position as part of my calling in life; I had trained myself to leave all the sympathies natural to my age in my employer's outer hall, as coolly as I left my umbrella there before I went upstairs.
His views and beliefs had nothing in them to shock or startle her, since she judged them from the standpoint of her lofty position.