popping


Also found in: Dictionary, Thesaurus, Medical, Encyclopedia, Wikipedia.
Like this video? Subscribe to our free daily email and get a new idiom video every day!

pop by (for a visit)

To come somewhere, usually a person's home or residence, for a brief or casual visit. Hey, if you're free this Saturday, why don't you pop by for a visit? I'd love to show you the new truck I bought. You and your girlfriend should pop by sometime. We could grab some dinner or go out for some drinks.
See also: by, pop

pop over (for a visit)

To come somewhere, usually a person's home or residence, for a brief or casual visit. Hey, if you're free this Saturday, why don't you pop over for a visit? I'd love to show you the new truck I bought. You and your girlfriend should pop over sometime. We could grab some dinner or go out for some drinks.
See also: over, pop

pop (one's) cherry

1. vulgar slang (of someone else) To have sexual intercourse with a virgin, especially a female. Before you go popping a girl's cherry, you had better make damn sure that you're both totally ready to sleep with each other.
2. vulgar slang (of oneself) To have sexual intercourse for the first time. There is nothing wrong with waiting until you're absolutely ready before you pop your cherry. Too many people try to pressure you into it from too young an age.
3. vulgar slang (of oneself) To do something for the first time, especially that which is particularly daunting, difficult, dangerous, or illegal. Somebody pass Marcus the joint, he still needs to pop his cherry tonight! For her birthday, I bought my friend Samantha a voucher so she could pop her cherry sky diving.
See also: cherry, pop

pop (one's) bubble

To disprove, ruin, or destroy someone's fantasy, delusion, or misbelief. A less common variant of "burst (someone's) bubble." Sorry to pop your bubble, Janet, but Sarah only went out on a date with you to make Suzie jealous. Sean took pleasure in popping the environmentalist's bubble, explaining to him that renewable energy devices cause huge environmental damage to produce.
See also: bubble, pop

pop the bubble of (someone)

To disprove, ruin, or destroy someone's fantasy, delusion, or misbelief. A less common variant of "burst the bubble of (someone)." The Supreme Court ruling is likely to pop the bubble of all the activists who were in favor of overturning the case.
See also: bubble, of, pop

pop the cherry

vulgar slang To have sexual intercourse for the first time. There is nothing wrong with waiting until you're absolutely ready before you pop the cherry. Too many people try to pressure you into it from too young an age.
See also: cherry, pop

pop (one's) clogs

To die. Primarily heard in UK. A friend of mine is convinced he's going to pop his clogs whenever he feels the slightest bit unwell.
See also: clog, pop

pop in (for a visit)

To come somewhere, usually a person's home, for a brief or casual visit. Hey, if you're free this Saturday, why don't you pop in for a visit? I'd love to show you the new truck I bought. If you're ever in town, you and your girlfriend should pop in. I just need to pop in at the office to see Cheryl, but I won't be staying all day.
See also: pop

(one's) eyes are popping out of (one's) head

One's facial expression indicates surprise or extreme interest in what one is looking at. My eyes practically were popping out of my head when I saw that my parents had bought me a car for my birthday! Stare much? Your eyes were popping out of your head when that guy walked past us.
See also: eye, head, of, out, popping

pop off

1. To say something very quickly or abruptly. A noun or pronoun can be used between "pop" and "off." I was able to pop off a few questions before the governor was escorted into his car.
2. To kill (someone), especially quickly or abruptly. A noun or pronoun can be used between "pop" and "off." Take a look, chief. The video shows the suspect pop the guard off before entering the building.
3. To have a sudden, thoughtless outburst or issue an angry remark or snide comment. Why did you pop off at me like that? I was just trying to help. If you're just going to sit there popping off all class, I'll have to ask you to leave.
4. To die suddenly or unexpectedly. No sooner had he taken control of the company than he up and popped off. Very suspicious, if you ask me.
5. To leave or depart suddenly, hurriedly, or unexpectedly. I think I'm going to pop off. I need to be up early tomorrow. She popped off before I could ask for her phone number.
See also: off, pop

pop the question

To ask someone to marry one. I'm planning on popping the question just before the fireworks start. He popped the question in a text message? That's the worst proposal I've ever heard of.
See also: pop, question

pop up

To suddenly appear or become available. Problems started popping up as soon as the software went live. The next page will pop up in a moment, just give it a second to load. Look at all the bubbles popping up on the surface—something must be swimming down there.
See also: pop, up

pop a wheelie

To cause one's bicycle or motorcycle to raise up on its rear wheel while still traveling steadily forward. She really gets a kick out of popping wheelies on her motorcycle in front of the neighbors. He tried to pop a wheelie, but ended up falling backwards onto his back.
See also: pop, wheelie

pop for (something)

To pay for something, especially as a treat for oneself or someone else. I decided to pop for the new video game as a reward to myself for doing so well on my exam. Janet is popping for a trip to Disney World for her family this summer.
See also: pop

pop into

1. To go into some place very briefly. I need to pop into my professor's office to drop off the assignment. Dan just popped into the butcher for some hamburger meat.
2. To put or toss something into something else very quickly, casually, or suddenly. In this usage, a noun or pronoun can be used between "pop" and "into." He popped a mint into his mouth, hopeful that he might get a kiss at the end of the date. Can you pop this letter into the mailbox for me when you go out later?
See also: pop

pop out

1. To jump, burst, or leap out. I went to open the mailbox, and I nearly got a heart attack when a raccoon popped out! The kids popped out from behind the couch to surprise their mother for her birthday. A bunch of confetti popped out of the party cracker.
2. To leave (some place) for a brief period of time. Dan just popped out to get some hamburger meat from the butcher. Would you mind the phone lines? I'm going to pop out for a bit of fresh air.
3. To cause something to become dislodged or released from something by applying force or pressure to it. In this usage, a noun or pronoun can be used between "pop" and "out." I accidentally popped one of the lenses out of my glasses while I was cleaning it. Just pop out the batteries and replace them with fresh ones.
See also: out, pop

pop off

 
1. Sl. to make an unnecessary remark; to interrupt with a remark; to sound off. Please don't pop off all the time. Bob keeps popping off when he should be listening.
2. Sl. to lose one's temper. Now, don't pop off. Keep your cool. I don't know why she popped off at me. All I did was say hello.
3. Sl. to die. My uncle popped off last week. I hope I'm asleep when I pop off.
4. Sl. to leave; to depart in haste. Bye, I must pop off. Got to pop off. I'm late.
See also: off, pop

pop out (of something)

to jump out of something; to burst out of something. Suddenly, a little mouse popped out of the drawer. I opened the drawer and a mouse popped out.
See also: out, pop

pop someone off

Inf. to kill someone. Max was told to pop Lefty off because he was trying to muscle in on the gang's turf. Max intended to pop off Lefty.
See also: off, pop

pop something into something

 and pop something in
to fit, snap, or press something into place in something. Lee popped the lever into place, and the machine began to function. Lee popped in the plastic part, and the toy ran beautifully.
See also: pop

pop something up

to remove something by making it jump or burst upwards. Henry popped the lid up and helped himself to the strawberry preserves. He popped up the lid and cleaned out the jam jar.
See also: pop, up

pop the question

[for a man] to ask a woman to marry him. (Could also be used by a woman asking a man.) She waited for years for him to pop the question. Finally she popped the question.
See also: pop, question

pop up

 
1. [for a baseball batter] to hit a baseball that goes high upward rather than outward. The catcher came to bat and popped up. I hope I don't pop up this time.
2. [for a baseball] to fly high upward rather than outward. The ball popped up and went foul. The ball will always pop up if you hit it in a certain way.
3. to arise suddenly; to appear without warning. New problems keep popping up all the time. Billy popped up out of nowhere and scared his mother.
See also: pop, up

pop up (some place)

to appear suddenly and unexpectedly some place. I never know where Henry is going to pop up next. A new problem has popped up.
See also: pop, up

pop off

1. Leave abruptly or hurriedly, as in I'm just going to pop off and mail some letters.
2. Die suddenly, as in No one expected her to pop off like that. [Colloquial; second half of 1700s]
3. Speak thoughtlessly in an angry outburst, as in Don't pop off at me-complain to whoever's responsible. [Slang; c. 1930]
4. pop someone off. Kill someone, as in The sniper popped off at least three men. [Slang; early 1800s] All four usages transfer pop in the sense of "explode" to other kinds of sudden or violent behavior.
See also: off, pop

pop the question

Propose marriage, as in He picked Valentine's Day to pop the question. [Early 1700s]
See also: pop, question

pop up

Suddenly appear, as in After a brief warm spell all the flowers popped up, or He's constantly popping up where he's least expected.
See also: pop, up

pop the question

INFORMAL
If you pop the question, you ask someone to marry you. Stuart got serious quickly and popped the question six months later.
See also: pop, question

pop the question

propose marriage. British informal
See also: pop, question

pop the ˈquestion

(informal) ask somebody to marry you: Where were you when he popped the question?
See also: pop, question

pop into

v.
1. To visit some place briefly: I'm going to pop into the store for a moment.
2. To put or throw something into something suddenly: He watched the movie while popping marshmallows into his mouth. She popped the DVD into the player.
See also: pop

pop off

v. Slang
1. To burst off with a short, sharp, explosive sound: If the pressure in the bottle gets too high, the top will pop off.
2. To leave abruptly or hurriedly: She popped off a few minutes ago, but I don't know where she went. He popped off to the store.
3. To speak thoughtlessly in a burst of released anger: The movie star popped off at the reporters who were hounding him.
4. To die suddenly: The book is about a rich man who pops off and leaves his family millions of dollars.
5. To kill someone: The gangster popped off the witness outside of the courtroom. She learned that he was a double agent, and so she popped him off the next time she saw him.
See also: off, pop

pop out

v.
1. To jump or burst out of something: I wound the jack-in-the-box until the puppet popped out.
2. To appear suddenly from within or behind something: Suddenly, a bear popped out from the bushes.
3. To cause something to be removed or released, especially with a small, quick push: The kids accidentally popped out the bottom pane of the window. The memory chip in my computer was broken, so I popped it out and installed a new one.
4. To leave briefly: He'll be back in a minute—he just popped out to get some coffee.
See also: out, pop

pop up

v.
1. To cause something to jump upwards, often with a short, sharp, explosive sound: The batter popped up a fly ball to center field, where it was caught. I wedged a crowbar under the lid of the crate and popped it up.
2. To appear suddenly or unexpectedly: He dived under the water and popped up at the other end of the pool. The doctor told me to call her if any new symptoms pop up.
See also: pop, up

pop off

1. in. to make an unnecessary remark; to interrupt with a remark; to sound off. Bob keeps popping off when he should be listening.
2. in. to lose one’s temper. (see also pop one’s cork.) I don’t know why she popped off at me. All I did was say hello.
3. in. to die. I hope I’m asleep when I pop off.
4. in. to leave; to depart in haste. Got to pop off. I’m late.
See also: off, pop

pop the question

tv. [for a man] to ask a woman to marry him. (Could also be used by a woman asking a man.) She waited for years for him to pop the question.
See also: pop, question

popping

in. happening. Things are always popping at the gym.

pop the question

Informal
To propose marriage.
See also: pop, question

pop a wheelie

To execute such a stunt.
See also: pop, wheelie
References in periodicals archive ?
For best results when popping popcorn stovetop, use a 4-quart pan, 3 tablespoons oil per 1/3 cup popcorn, and medium to medium-high heat.
The company's self-contained equipment produces fresh, hot popcorn for each customer while allowing the customer to watch the entire popping process.
The Company's self-contained equipment allows each customer to choose butter and the level of salt desired (if any) while viewing the entire popping process.
They're deplorable," says Peter Winston, President of the PopUp Network, in reference to the X10 Camera ads that are popping up almost everywhere.
Pop N Go is already popping for one of the world's largest supermarket chains, two leading shopping mall chains, America's largest theater chain, and one of the most prestigious office-building owners in the world.
Pop N Go's self contained equipment allows each customer to choose butter and the level of salt desired (if any) while viewing the entire popping process.