pope


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Related to pope: Pope Joan, Alexander Pope, Pope Benedict XVI, List of popes

be more Catholic than the Pope (himself)

1. To be more stringently adherent to the laws, tenets, and doctrines of the Catholic faith than is taught or required by the papacy or the Church as a whole. (Usually used hyperbolically as a negative or mocking criticism of someone as being overly pious.) I can't believe we're not allowed to eat meat on Fridays while we're staying with Grandma. She's more Catholic than the Pope himself! Ah, would you stop with your protestations of our mortal sins and telling us to repent every minute of the day! I swear, you're more Catholic than the Pope.
2. By extension, to be more extreme in one's beliefs, behavior, attitudes, etc., than that of the prevailing authority or standard of normalcy. After a year, Jake had started using every dialectic cliché and slang word he had heard in his adopted country, and soon, he was more Catholic than the Pope, so to speak.
See also: catholic, more, pope

outpope the Pope

1. To be or act more stringently adherent to the laws, tenets, and doctrines of the Christian faith (not limited to Catholicism) than is taught or required by the papacy or Christianity as a whole. (Usually used hyperbolically as a negative or mocking criticism of someone as being overly pious.) I can't believe we're not allowed to eat meat on Fridays while we're staying with Grandma. She could outpope the Pope! The zealous preacher-turned-Senator's campaign is so strictly rooted in Biblical law that many feel he's outpoping the Pope.
2. By extension, to be more extreme in one's behavior, attitudes, practices, etc., than that of the prevailing authority or standard of normalcy. Among the Nordic countries, all well known for their social welfare, Denmark outpopes the Pope in terms of providing care for its people.
See also: pope

pope's nose

The fatty tail of a cooked fowl, especially a chicken. When we were kids, it was always a special treat to be given the pope's nose off the Sunday roast chicken.
See also: nose

said the actress to the pope

An aside that is used to create a humorous but lewd sexual innuendo out of something mundane or innocent that someone else has said. (The use of "actress" is because the innuendo always refers to a woman in a sexual situation.) Primarily heard in UK. A: "Wow, that sandwich is huge!" B: "Yeah, I can barely put my hands around it." C: "Said the actress to the pope!"
See also: actress, pope, said

as the actress said to the pope

An aside that is used to create a humorous but lewd sexual innuendo out of something mundane or innocent that someone else has said. (The use of "actress" is because the innuendo always refers to a woman in a sexual situation.) Primarily heard in UK. A: "Wow, that sandwich is huge!" B: "Yeah, I can barely put my hands around it." C: "As the actress said to the pope!"
See also: actress, pope, said

does the Pope shit in the woods

vulgar slang A sarcastic response to a question for which the answer is obviously "yes." A combination of the similar phrases "Does a bear shit in the woods?" and "Is the Pope Catholic?" A: "Are we going to win this game?" B: "Does the Pope shit in the woods? We're first in the division, of course we're going to win!"
See also: does, pope, shit, wood

is the pope Catholic

A humorous response to a question that the speaker feels would obviously be answered in the affirmative. A: "Are you going to the party tonight?" B: "Is the pope Catholic? Of course I'll be there!"
See also: catholic, pope

more Catholic than the Pope (himself)

1. More stringently adherent to the laws, tenets, and doctrines of the Catholic faith than is taught or required by the papacy or the Church as a whole. (Usually used hyperbolically as a negative or mocking criticism of someone as being overly pious.) I can't believe we're not allowed to eat meat on Fridays while we're staying with Grandma. She's more Catholic than the Pope himself! Ah, would you stop with your protestations of our mortal sins and telling us to repent every minute of the day! I swear, you're more Catholic than the Pope.
2. By extension, more extreme in one's beliefs, behavior, attitudes, etc., than that of the prevailing authority or standard of normalcy. After a year, Jake had started using every dialectic cliché and slang word he had heard in his adopted country, and soon he was more Catholic than the Pope, so to speak.
See also: catholic, more, pope

Is the pope a Catholic?

  (humorous)
used to say that the answer to a question you have just been asked is obviously 'yes' Do I like chocolate? Is the pope a Catholic?
See also: pope
References in classic literature ?
From the two Homeric poems together, thanks to this device, Pope realized a profit of nearly L9000, and thus proved that an author might be independent of the publisher.
Somewhat like Swift, Pope was loyal and kind to his friends and inoffensive to persons against whom he did not conceive a prejudice.
During his last fifteen years Pope's original work was done chiefly in two very closely related fields, first in a group of what he called 'Moral' essays, second in the imitation of a few of the Satires and Epistles of Horace, which Pope applied to circumstances of his own time.
He derived the ideas, in fragmentary fashion, from Bolingbroke, who was an amateur Deist and optimist of the shallow eighteenth century type, and so far was Pope from understanding what he was doing that he was greatly disturbed when it was pointed out to him that the theology of the poem was Deistic rather than Christian [Footnote: The name Deist was applied rather generally in the eighteenth century to all persons who did not belong to some recognized Christian denomination.
Yet after all that must be said against Pope, it is only fair to conclude, as does his biographer, Sir Leslie Stephen: 'It was a gallant spirit which got so much work out of this crazy carcase, and kept it going, spite of all its feebleness, for fifty-six years.
As the pseudo-classic spirit yielded to the romantic this judgment was modified, until in the nineteenth century it was rather popular to deny that in any true sense Pope was a poet at all.
Note: The judgments of certain prominent critics on the poetry of Pope and of his period may well be considered.
Still more hostile is Matthew Arnold: 'The difference between genuine poetry and the poetry of Dryden, Pope, and all their school, is briefly this: Their poetry is conceived and composed in their wits, genuine poetry is conceived and composed in the soul.
To the informal position of dictator of English letters which had been held successively by Dryden, Addison, and Pope, succeeded in the third quarter of the eighteenth century a man very different from any of them, one of the most forcefully individual of all authors, Samuel Johnson.
Sir Robert Walpole, ruling the country with unscrupulous absolutism, had now put an end to the employment of literary men in public life, and though Johnson's poem 'London,' a satire on the city written in imitation of the Roman poet Juvenal and published in 1738, attracted much attention, he could do no better for a time than to become one of that undistinguished herd of hand-to-mouth and nearly starving Grub Street writers whom Pope was so contemptuously abusing and who chiefly depended on the despotic patronage of magazine publishers.
said then the old pope, with intent ears; "O Zarathustra, thou art more pious than thou believest, with such an unbelief
Pope Francis, "lane-wise, seems like a drunk driver," Ransom wrote.
The Pope Identity, The Pope Supremacy, and The Pope Ultimatum @mrcrjjones 3/13/13
The Pope and the spiritual leader of the Anglican Communion met at the Vatican on Nov.
The late pope repeatedly emphasized the value and necessity of Gregorian chant even to the extent that "new compositions must be imbued with the same spirit that inspired" it.