poke

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slowpoke

Someone who moves or does things in a particularly slow or sluggish manner; someone who is or has been dawdling. We're never going to finish our project by the deadline with this slowpoke weighing us down! Hurry up, slowpoke! We're not going to wait all day for you to catch up with us.

pig in a poke

Something that is purchased without having been thoroughly inspected, often with negative consequences. A "poke" is a bag. Purchasing a home without inspecting it first is like buying a pig in a poke.
See also: pig, poke

buy a pig in a poke

Fig. to buy something without looking inside first. If you don't get a good look at the engine of a used car before you buy it, you'll wind up buying a pig in a poke. I just took the salesman's word that this camera worked. I guess I bought a pig in a poke.
See also: buy, pig, poke

make fun of someone or something

to ridicule someone or something. Are you making fun of me? I am making fun of your hat.
See also: fun, make, of

poke a hole in something

 and poke a hole through something
to make a hole by pushing something through something; to push something through a hole. The carpenter poked a hole in the wall with a nail. The fisherman poked a hole through the ice with a pick.
See also: hole, poke

poke about (in something)

 and poke around (in something)
to rummage around in something or some place; to look through things in something or some place. I'll have to go up and poke about in the attic to see if lean find it. Janet went to the attic and spent the rest of the afternoon poking around.
See also: poke

poke along

to move along slowly; to lag or tarry. Get moving. Stop poking along. I was just poking along, taking my time, not paying attention to what was going on around me.
See also: poke

poke around

 
1. and poke about to look or search around. I've been poking around in the library looking for some statistics. I don't mind if you look in my drawer for a paper clip, but please don't poke about.
2. to waste time while moving about. I just poked around all afternoon and didn't accomplish much. Stop poking around and get moving.
See also: around, poke

poke around

(in something) Go to poke about (in something).
See also: around, poke

poke at someone or something

to thrust or jab at someone or something. Stop poking at me! Don't poke at the turtle. It might bite you.
See also: poke

poke fun at someone or something

to make fun of someone or something. You shouldn't poke fun at me for my mistakes. They are just poking fun at the strange architecture.
See also: fun, poke

poke one's nose in (to something)

 and stick one's nose in (to something)
Fig. to interfere with something; to be nosy about something. I wish you'd stop poking your nose into my business. She was too upset for me to stick my nose in and ask what was wrong.
See also: nose, poke

poke out (of something)

to stick out of something; to extend out of something. The bean sprouts were beginning to poke out of the soil of the garden. I knew there were little birds in the birdhouse, because a little head poked out now and then.
See also: out, poke

poke someone in something

to strike or jab someone in some body part. Billy poked Bobby in the tummy and made him cry. She poked herself in the eye accidentally.
See also: poke

poke something at someone or something

to jab or thrust something at someone or something. Don't poke that thing at me! The hunter poked his spear at the pig one more time and decided it was dead.
See also: poke

poke something into something

 and poke something in
to stick or cram something into something. He poked his finger into the jam, pulled it out again, and licked it. Jeff poked in his finger.
See also: poke

poke something out of something

 and poke something out
to thrust something out of something. The lobster poked its antennae out of the little cave and wiggled them around. It poked out its antennae.
See also: of, out, poke

poke something through someone or something

to jab or stab something through someone or something. The evil knight poked his weapon through Arthur and withdrew it again. Danny poked his finger through the plastic pool liner by mistake.
See also: poke

poke through (something)

to stick through something; to extend through something. The tips of Tommy's toes poked through his sneakers and looked very cold. The end of the lost spoon poked through the piecrust on the freshly baked pie. Now we knew where it had disappeared to.
See also: poke

take a pop at someone

 and take a poke at someone
to punch at someone. Willie took a pop at me, but I ducked. The drunk took a poke at the copwhich was the wrong thing to do.
See also: pop, take

make fun of somebody/something

also poke fun at somebody/something
to make someone or something seem ridiculous by making jokes about them When she first moved north, some people made fun of her southern accent.
Related vocabulary: goof on somebody
See also: fun, make, of

poke your nose into something

also stick your nose in something
to try to discover things that do not involve you The government has no business poking its nose into people's personal lives.
See also: nose, poke

a pig in a poke

something that you buy without knowing if it is good or not When you buy a used car, you may be getting a pig in a poke.
Etymology: based on an old meaning of buy a pig in a poke (buy a pig in a bag), which you would buy without first seeing it
See also: pig, poke

make fun of somebody/something

  also poke fun at somebody/something
to make a joke about someone or something in an unkind way At first the kids made fun of her because she spoke with a Dutch accent.
See also: fun, make, of

poke/stick your nose into something

  (informal)
to show too much interest in a situation that does not involve you That'll teach him to go poking his nose into other people's business!
See also: nose, poke

a pig in a poke

something that you buy or accept without first seeing it or knowing what it is like, with the result that it might not be what you want Clothes from a catalogue are a pig in a poke. You can't feel the quality of the fabric or know if the clothes will fit.
See also: pig, poke

make fun of

Also, poke fun at; make sport of. Mock, ridicule, as in The girls made fun of Mary's shoes, or They poked fun at Willie's haircut, or I wish you wouldn't make sport of the new boy. The first term dates from the early 1700s, the second from the mid-1800s, and the third from the early 1500s.
See also: fun, make, of

pig in a poke

An object offered in a manner that conceals its true value, especially its lack of value. For example, Eric believes that buying a used car is buying a pig in a poke. This expression alludes to the practice of substituting a worthless object, such as a cat, for the costly suckling pig a customer has bought and wrapping it in a poke, or sack. It dates from a time when buyers of groceries relied on a weekly farmers' market and, unless they were cautious enough to check the poke's contents, would not discover the skullduggery until they got home. The word poke dates from the 13th century but is now used mainly in the southern United States. The idiom was first recorded in John Heywood's 1562 collection of proverbs. Also see let the cat out of the bag.
See also: pig, poke

poke around

Also, poke about. Look through things; also, make an investigation. For example, I was poking around the attic when I found these old photos, or The detective was poking about, tracking where she went on that fatal day. [Early 1800s] Also see nose about; poke one's nose into.
See also: around, poke

poke fun at

see under make fun of.
See also: fun, poke

poke one's nose into

Pry into or meddle in another's affairs, as in I told her to stop poking her nose into our business. This usage replaced the earlier thrust one's nose into in the mid-1800s.
See also: nose, poke

take a poke at

Hit with one's fist, as in If you don't quit teasing I'll take a poke at you. [Colloquial; c. 1930]
See also: poke, take

poke out

v.
1. To stick outward; protrude: A tag is poking out of your shirt. They were so thin that their bones were poking out.
2. To cause something to be dislodged by prodding it: Be careful with that ice pick—you might poke out your eye. I poked the ants out of the hole with a stick.
3. To extend something through some gap or hole, especially cautiously: The gopher poked its head out the entrance of its tunnel.
See also: out, poke

poke

1. n. a puff of a marijuana cigarette or pipe. (see also toke.) Can I have a poke of that?
2. tv. [for a male] to copulate (with a female). (Crude. Usually objectionable.) Your dog poked my dog, then ran away.

make fun of

To mock; ridicule.
See also: fun, make, of

pig in a poke

Something that is offered in a manner that conceals its true nature or value.
See also: pig, poke

poke fun at

To ridicule in a mischievous manner.
See also: fun, poke

pig in a poke

An item bought without prior inspection. A poke is a “bag.” Purchasing something that you've not seen is the basis of the image—you don't know the condition of the pig in the bag until after you've bought it. It may be exactly what was advertised, or it may be something much worse than what the seller described—the swine!
See also: pig, poke
References in periodicals archive ?
One day one of the kids who poked me came right up to me like he knew me.
For six years, he was also the face of South Africa's highest-selling brand of tea in television commercials - but he had to return to the UK in the 60s because the then South African government took exception to his satirical brand of song which often poked fun at apartheid.
Knapp reported that when Quintana came on the scene Tuesday evening she pushed one woman out of the way, then grabbed and poked Tracey Chandler, the Whittier mother of four who has maintained the memorial following the Sept.
An 11-year-old Australian girl was rescued from the jaws of a crocodile by a man who leapt on the reptile's back and poked it in the eye.
Craig Williams, 23, lost the sight of his right eye when Fay Gutteridge poked him in it with her finger.
Ouch department: North Hollywood's Josiah James, who is drawing interest from a number of Division II schools, is on the mend after getting poked in the eye during a recent game against Murphy.
Only a forceful thrust--which severed the stone's tip as it penetrated the animal's flesh and broke off its base once the point poked through the bone--could have wedged the weapon into that position, the team holds.
Mr Foster added: ''He grabbed her by the scruff of the neck, hit her on the head and poked her in the face with his fingers.
She poked him in the chest before trying to chase him as he retreated into the media scrum in Northampton.
The victim, Steven Bloch, 42, told police an unknown man approached him from the rear, poked him in the back with an object and demanded the money bag Bloch was holding outside the store at 1840 Cochran St.
THE crew on Hugh Grant's new movie poked public fun at reports the actor had blazing on-set rows with co-star Sandra Bullock.
A couple of them got ornery and poked holes in the containers.
For 46 years, Walker has poked fun at life and the Army at Camp Swampy, where Pvt.
Add Davis: A heckling fan who was poked and slapped by Davis at County Stadium last summer has filed a lawsuit against him.
The pup poked his head into the sink's 6-inch drain, and got stuck.