poetic


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wax poetic

To speak in a poetic manner, often exaggeratedly or verbosely so. The entertainer has a habit of waxing poetic during interviews, which delights some people and infuriates others. Dan always starts waxing poetic after he's had a few drinks.
See also: poetic, wax

poetic justice

A punishment or unfavorable outcome that is particularly appropriate or ironic. The CEO of the cigarette manufacturer, who has long denied the health risks associated with smoking, just died of lung cancer—now isn't that poetic justice?
See also: justice, poetic

poetic license

1. Intentional violations of or deviations from traditional forms, standards, or syntax by a writer in order to achieve a particular effect. Any two-bit poet can string together a jumble of words and call it poetic license. Don't get hung up on adhering too strictly to iambic pentameter—you can use a bit of poetic license if it means preserving the meaning and rhythm you want.
2. Changes to or misrepresentations of facts or history in the name of art or for the sake of an agenda. The film uses a bit too much poetic license, portraying the warriors as "saviors" of the region, while ignoring the fact that they slaughtered thousands of innocent people.
See also: license, poetic

poetic justice

appropriate, ideal, or ironic punishment. It was poetic justice that Jane won the race after Mary tried to get her banned from the race. The car thieves tried to steal a car with no gas. That's poetic justice.
See also: justice, poetic

poetic license

liberties or license of the type taken by artists, especially poets, to violate patterns of rhyme, harmony, structure, etc. I couldn't tell whether he kept making spelling mistakes or if it was just poetic license.
See also: license, poetic

wax poetic

Fig. to speak poetically. I hope you will pardon me if I wax poetic for a moment when I say that your lovely hands drift across the piano keys like swans on a lake.
See also: poetic, wax

poetic justice

An outcome in which virtue is rewarded and evil punished, often in an especially appropriate or ironic manner. For example, It was poetic justice for the known thief to go to jail for the one crime he didn't commit . [Early 1700s]
See also: justice, poetic

poetic license

Also, artistic license. The liberty taken by a writer or artist in deviating from conventional form or fact to achieve an effect. For example, I've never seen grass or a tree of that color; but that's artistic license. [Late 1700s]
See also: license, poetic

poetic justice

Poetic justice is when bad things happen to someone who deserves it. Perhaps his illness was some kind of poetic justice for having deceived so many for so long. Note: Occasionally people use poetic justice to describe something good that happens to someone who deserves it. If one can resolve several problems at once — ours as well as yours — it has a certain poetic justice.
See also: justice, poetic

poetic justice

the fact of experiencing a fitting or deserved retribution for your actions.
This phrase is from Alexander Pope's satire The Dunciad: ‘Poetic Justice, with her lifted scale’.
See also: justice, poetic

artistic/poetic ˈlicence

(often ironic) the freedom of artists or writers to change facts in order to make a story, painting, etc. more interesting or beautiful: In the book, a fair amount of artistic licence has been taken with the timing of historical events so that they fit with the story.I allowed myself a little poetic licence in describing the table as an antique.
Licence in this idiom means ‘freedom to do or say whatever you want’.
See also: artistic, licence, poetic

poetic ˈjustice

a punishment or reward that is deserved: If you ask me it’s poetic justice. He tried to get you fired, and now he’s lost his job himself.
See also: justice, poetic
References in periodicals archive ?
Overall, almost 40% of Chinese scholars engage in comparative poetics by taking poetics as literary theory in general whereas 10% of them deal with poetic techniques.
Rouget's edition of Magny's Odes situates their principal interest in their contributions to contemporary poetic debates: for example, to the dispute surrounding the value of the Petrarchan cult of the unique lady.
These poetic tensions simmer along the recesses of the territory that the collection explores: New World, American, Black.
Gidal's method is to juxtapose, move between, and bring into direct opposition museum guidebooks, parliamentary debates on the function of the museum, contemporary accounts of the experience of the museum, and a range of poetic texts concerned in various ways with 'the perception of material objects and the reflective creation of individual and collective identities' (p.
More specifically in terms of representation, Haddad examines the "aesthetic compromise" (2002, 55) with neoclassicism reached by Hugo in Les Orientales and the parodic orientalism with which Musset responded to Hugo and challenged mimesis in "Namouna: conte oriental," Hugo offered orientalism as a poetic methodology, an intellectual mode of engagement, that asserted the Orient as a proper subject for poetry.
Ramat's poetic discourse embraces metaphors as an essential element of its lyrical syntax.
RECURRENT ALSO IN Finnish daylighting is a fusion of rational illumination and poetic evocation.
From the beginning of his career Yusuf was interested not only in registering the poetic glow in the ordinary and the common, but also in portraying the seemingly insignificant.
Like the work of Alwin Nikolais, with whom he studied (in addition to Marcel Marceau and Merce Cunningham), Decoufle's work is all about appearance and magic, transformation and illusion, but also about detail and timing: the elements that transform individual ideas (let's have dancers on elasticized ropes, bounding on and off a sofa; let's do a dance echoed by an inverted mirror-figure directly beneath) into a collage of resonantly humorous and poetic images.
Such inclusion raised the question of the nature of poetic validity and its role in forming a community.
This commitment to a poetic program as well as to a social agenda is a distinctive mark of Bernstein's overall stance.
In their introduction to Wordsworth's Poetic Theory, Alexander Regier and Stefan Uhlig respond that "Wordsworth makes his contribution to our modern ways of thinking about poetry both inside his poetic writing and alongside it," and moreover that his theory "forms a decisive part of his work's claim on us" (1).
She writes as mother and artist, reflecting her personal thoughts and feelings as she surveys the landscape through which she must chart her own poetic journey.
The haiku is perhaps the most succinct and versatile of all the diverse forms of poetic expression.
Tiger and Other Poems is the seventh verse collection of Niranjan Mohanty (1953-2008), who made a notable contribution in the field of Indian poetry in English through his innovative poetic idiom.